Mount Sinai Imaging Expert Jagat Narula, MD, PhD to Receive Distinguished Award

New York, NY
 – May 26, 2016 /Press Release/  –– 

Jagat Narula, MD, PhD, MACC, Director of the Cardiovascular Imaging Program in Mount Sinai’s Zena and Michael A. Wiener Cardiovascular Institute and the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Center for Cardiovascular Health, is the recipient of the 2016 Arthur S. Agatston Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Award of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT). The award, which recognizes individuals whose pioneering efforts have saved lives from heart disease, the world’s leading killer, will be presented to Dr. Narula in Orlando, Florida, at the SCCT 2016 Annual Scientific Meeting's Opening Session on Friday, June 24, 2016.

SCCT will recognize Dr. Narula, who is also Professor of Medicine and the Philip J. and Harriet L. Goodhart Chair in Cardiology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, for his lifelong contributions to disease prevention in the field of cardiology, in particular for his work in prevention of myocardial infarction and heart failure through novel imaging techniques. His pioneering research has combined molecular and subcellular imaging with clinical imaging of the failing myocardium and high-risk coronary atherosclerotic plaques. Dr. Narula's contributions have been fundamental in developing innovative strategies for prevention of cardiovascular disease: uncovering the phenomenon of heart muscle cell suicide, vastly improved detection of atherosclerotic plaques likely to cause acute heart attacks, and many other advances. For his contributions, he was also awarded the Maseri Florio International Award of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) earlier this year during the Annual Meeting of the ACC in Chicago.

"I am honored to receive this award in recognition of my research," said Dr. Narula. "I am grateful to the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography for this prestigious recognition of my scientific pursuits to advance cardiac patient care, research, and medical education."

"I am very proud of Dr. Narula, his significant contributions to the field, and his strong commitment to improving cardiovascular medicine at Mount Sinai and around the globe," said Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart and Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital, who serves as the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC). Notably, Dr. Fuster was the 2013 recipient of the Agatston Award.

Dr. Narula, who is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging and Executive Editor of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology,  has written more than 1,000 research publications or presentations and edited more than 25 books and special journal supplements. His research has contributed to development of new noninvasive imaging techniques in areas such as describing the phenomenon of apoptosis (programmed cell death) and the vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques.

"SCCT hopes that recognizing individuals such as Dr. Narula, for leadership and vision in preventing heart disease, will be a catalyst to inspire the next generation of physicians and researchers to do even more. As we did with infectious diseases like polio and smallpox, we can eradicate the killer heart disease," commented Jack A. Ziffer, MD, PhD, Past President of SCCT and Chair of the Arthur S. Agatston Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Award Selection Committee. "Dr. Narula has improved health care on a global scale, and it is a privilege to honor him with this award."

Arthur Agatston, MD, the award's namesake, is a visionary and pioneer in the field of noninvasive cardiac imaging and one of the world's leading preventive cardiologists. His scientific work, first reported in 1991 with Warren Janowitz, MD, JD, resulted in the Agatston score, a method for screening patients for coronary artery disease by measuring the amount of calcium in the coronary arteries. The Agatston score is used throughout the world and considered by many experts to be the single best predictor of future heart attack. To help his cardiovascular and diabetes patients improve their blood chemistries and lose weight, Dr. Agatston also developed The South Beach Diet, a No. 1 New York Times bestseller. Dr. Agatston serves as the Medical Director of Wellness and Prevention at Baptist Health South Florida.

About the Mount Sinai Health System
The Mount Sinai Health System is an integrated health system committed to providing distinguished care, conducting transformative research, and advancing biomedical education. Structured around seven hospital campuses and a single medical school, the Health System has an extensive ambulatory network and a range of inpatient and outpatient services—from community-based facilities to tertiary and quaternary care.

The System includes approximately 6,100 primary and specialty care physicians; 12 joint-venture ambulatory surgery centers; more than 140 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and 31 affiliated community health centers. Physicians are affiliated with the renowned Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, which is ranked among the highest in the nation in National Institutes of Health funding per investigator. The Mount Sinai Hospital is ranked as one of the nation’s top 10 hospitals in Geriatrics, Cardiology/Heart Surgery, and Gastroenterology, and is in the top 25 in five other specialties in the 2015-2016 “Best Hospitals” issue of U.S. News & World Report. Mount Sinai’s Kravis Children’s Hospital also is ranked in seven out of ten pediatric specialties by U.S. News & World Report. The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked 11th nationally for Ophthalmology, while Mount Sinai Beth Israel is ranked regionally.

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