Mount Sinai Medical Center Honors Founders and Partners of the Visiting Doctors Program

The founders of The Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors Program were honored April 21, 2010, at a celebration and awards presentation commemorating its 15th anniversary.

New York, NY
 – April 26, 2010 /Press Release/  –– 

The founders of The Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors Program were honored April 21, 2010, at a celebration and awards presentation commemorating the 15th anniversary of the School of Medicine’s award-winning home health care service for homebound patients.

Founders David Muller, MD, Dean of Medical Education, Mount Sinai School of Medicine; Jeremy Boal, MD, currently Medical Director at Long Island Jewish Hospital; Laurent Adler, MD, MS, Market Medical Director at UnitedHealthcare, Health Services; and Carmen Andujar, RN, Referrals Nurse, The Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors, along with partner organizations The Little Sisters of the Assumption and the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, were honored at the event.

Awards were presented by Paul Klotman, MD, Chairman, Samuel Bronfman Department of Medicine, Murray M. Rosenberg Professor of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and Dennis S. Charney, MD, Anne and Joel Ehrenkranz Dean of Mount Sinai School of Medicine and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs at The Mount Sinai Medical Center.

The anniversary event was sponsored by Drs. Charney and Klotman along with Kenneth L. Davis, MD, President and Chief Executive Officer of The Mount Sinai Medical Center, and Albert L. Siu, MD, MSPH, Ellen and Howard C. Katz Chairman’s Chair, Brookdale Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine. New York City Council Member Daniel Garodnick delivered remarks.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg sent a letter in honor of the occasion in which he noted, "The Visiting Doctors Program has made a significant difference in the lives of so many of our residents. What’s more, the program offers exemplary training to the next generation of medical professionals, ensuring that our City remains at the forefront of medicine and that our residents continue to have access to the excellent care they need and deserve."

In presenting the Partner Award to The Little Sisters of the Assumption Family Health Service and The Visiting Nurse Service of New York, Dr. Charney stated, "Throughout Mount Sinai’s history, our ability to serve our community has been strengthened by the fact that we have not tried to go it alone. Rather we are privileged to work with a plethora of dedicated, passionate, and intelligent individuals and organizations who share our vision. Tonight we honor two organizations that have provided critical guidance, support and resources for the Visiting Doctors Program — The Little Sisters of the Assumption Family Health Service and The Visiting Nurse Service of New York."

Theresa Soriano, MD, MPH, Director of The Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors Program, said, "Thanks to the collective efforts of our founders, faculty and staff, Mount Sinai leadership, community partners, and donors and supporters over the past 15 years, The Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors Program has enhanced quality of life for thousands of patients, eased the burdens carried by caregivers, and developed unique educational programs for medical students and residents."

Over the past year, The Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors Program has conducted more than 6,000 home visits. Under the direction of Dr. Soriano and Dr. Linda DeCherrie, 14 physicians, four social workers, four nurses and eight support staff work in the program. Each physician cares for 25-100 patients and makes home visits on weekdays. RNs handle intake, clinical triage, and prescriptions.

About The Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors Program
Since 1995, The Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors Program has served almost 4,000 homebound patients living in East and Central Harlem as well as throughout Manhattan. The patients served are predominantly elderly (more than half are 80 years of age or older), and suffer from several medical and psychiatric conditions making it difficult for them to seek regular medical care. These conditions include dementia, Parkinson’s disease, stroke, emphysema, congestive heart failure, depression, cancer and arthritis. The Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors Program provides training to more than 200 medical students, residents and fellows every year, including visiting trainees from institutions around the country and nations abroad. Every resident in Internal Medicine at Mount Sinai spends one month with the program visiting patients in their homes and reflecting on what it truly means to be a physician entrusted with the lives of other human beings. For more information see www.mountsinai.org/visitingdoctors or call (212) 241-4141.

About The Mount Sinai Medical Center
The Mount Sinai Medical Center encompasses both The Mount Sinai Hospital and Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Established in 1968, Mount Sinai School of Medicine is one of few medical schools embedded in a hospital in the United States. It has more than 3,400 faculty in 32 departments and 15 institutes, and ranks among the top 20 medical schools both in National Institute of Health funding and by U.S. News & World Report. The school received the 2009 Spencer Foreman Award for Outstanding Community Service from the Association of American Medical Colleges.

The Mount Sinai Hospital, founded in 1852, is a 1,171-bed tertiary- and quaternary-care teaching facility and one of the nation’s oldest, largest and most-respected voluntary hospitals. In 2009, U.S. News & World Report ranked The Mount Sinai Hospital among the nation’s top 20 hospitals based on reputation, patient safety, and other patient-care factors. Nearly 60,000 people were treated at Mount Sinai as inpatients last year, and approximately 530,000 outpatient visits took place.

For more information, visit www.mountsinai.org.