Cancer Biology

Despite progress in elucidating mechanisms underlying human cancer, further basic understanding is required. At the same time, increased efforts are needed to translate increasing mechanistic knowledge into improved diagnostic, preventive, and treatment modalities.

The goal of this training program is to develop a cadre of highly selected and committed scientists, skilled in molecular and cellular biology, who will pursue long-term careers in cancer research. Themes include cancer gene signaling pathways, development and differentiation, invasion and metastasis, as well as disease focuses including breast, prostate cancer, leukemia, and melanoma. The program also trains investigators in approaches aimed at translation research advances to the clinic. This involves advanced course work in both basic and clinical cancer biology.

All trainees will participate in conferences that will utilize the superb clinical resources at Mount Sinai and will further expose trainees to clinical aspects of cancer. This training program combines research in the biology of cancer with a curriculum that challenges trainees to consider how their research may be translated into improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. The trainees will work closely with faculty who will be drawn from throughout Mount Sinai ensuring that this research is both comprehensive in scope and related to practical issues faced by physicians in preventing and treating cancer.


Meet the Co-Director

Matthew J. O'Connell, PhD, is Professor in the Department of Oncological Sciences and Co-Director of the Cancer Biology MTA. His research focuses on identifying new genes and pathways that maintain the integrity of the genome as cells divide, and how this can be exploited in developing cancer therapeutics.

Meet the Co-Director

James J. Manfredi, PhD, is a Professor in the Department of Oncological Sciences and Co-Director of the Cancer Biology MTA. His research focuses on the molecular biology of the tumor suppressor p53 and how the p53 pathway can be used exploited to enhance cancer therapy.

Deadline for application is Dec. 1st.

Contact Us

Send e-mail: grads@mssm.edu

The Graduate School of 
Biomedical Sciences
One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1022
New York, NY 10029-6574