Training

Our Pediatric Residency Training Program, located at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, is designed to prepare new physicians for a career in Pediatric medicine or a related Pediatric subspecialty.

Approximately 15 percent of our three-year training program is dedicated to continuity practice. Our continuity practice curriculum focuses on community and primary care pediatrics as well as focused small group training sessions during block rotations.

Our program offers numerous didactic conferences. Key conference series that occur on most business days include Morning Report, Inpatient Noon Conference, and our 1 pm Primary Pediatrics conference. These conferences cover the entire spectrum of Pediatric and subspecialty care, as well as advocacy and ethical issues. A particular highlight of our didactic program is Morning report. This case presentation conference is attended by the chairman and program director as well as other key faculty members. Residents present standout clinical cases from our inpatient wards. Pediatric radiology is often able to be present to interpret and teach from diagnostic studies related to the case. The discussion is extremely robust and focuses on differential diagnostic techniques, management challenges, and clinical reasoning.

We also host weekly formal Grand Rounds, a monthly journal club presented by the residents and a faculty member mentor, as well as a monthly morbidity and mortality conference. Each of the pediatric subspecialty services has its own rounds and conferences. Residents also participate in our high-fidelity simulation curriculum, which consists of weekly mock codes on the inpatient units, formal training in the Society for Critical Care Medicine’s PFCC (Pediatric Fundamentals in Critical Care Support) course, and a month-long SIM, QI, and transport rotation where residents design and teach SIM cases.

All pediatric residents are asked to choose a scholarly focus. Prior projects have included those focused on quality improvement, medical education, global health, advocacy, clinical research, and basic science research.

Global Health Scholarly Focus

Each year, we accept one or two residents into our Global Health Program. Acceptance into this program guarantees a two month, call-free period to allow for international travel during the PGY-3 year. Global health residents participate in monthly meetings with a project mentor and attend global health conferences. Specialized courses include Introduction to Global Health MPH courses and participation in monthly journal clubs during the PGY-1 and PGY-2 years.

Community Initiatives and Advocacy 

We have a longstanding commitment to improving the health of our community. Our program seeks to provide residents with the skills they need to advocate for patients at the local, state, and national level. Our residents are active in a variety of community settings and participate in our community obesity prevention programs, school-based education initiatives, and various clinic outreach projects.

During one of their Community Pediatric Block rotations, all residents participate in our Pediatric School Health Program in East Harlem, which is designed to improve access to primary health care and social services for elementary school children and families by developing school-based health services and an outpatient referral network.

Training Schedules

Below is a typical resident's schedule (in weeks).

Rotation

PGY-1

PGY-2

PGY-3

Mount Sinai Inpatient

8-12

4-8

4

Pediatric ER

6-8

4

4

Pediatric ICU

0

4

4

Elective

4

20

26

Elmhurst Inpatient

0-4

0-4

0

Mount Sinai NICU

4

4

4

Well Baby Nursery

4-6

0

0

Vacation

4

4

4

Adolescent Medicine

4

0

0

Ambulatory Block

4

4

4

Developmental Pediatrics

4

0

0

Teaching

0

0

4

Transport Rotation

0

0-4

4

PGY-1 house officers act as primary physicians for our patients on the wards. They are responsible for taking histories, performing physical examinations, and carrying out diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The PGY-1 resident is supervised by a PGY-2 or PGY-3 resident and the Attending physician directly responsible for each patient's care. PGY-1s are also responsible for supervising and teaching third-year medical students.

As a PGY-1, you’ll gain experience in the NICU, well baby nursery, emergency room, and outpatient experience in our continuity clinic and our development clinic. You also may rotate at our teaching affiliate, Elmhurst Hospital Center, an acute care hospital in New York City’s municipal health care system.

PGY-1 Call Schedule

The intern schedule is a shift-based schedule. Our schedules are made to comply with both New York State and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty hour rules. Interns work no more than 14 hours a day with ten hours off in between shifts and one day off per week.

For each four-week inpatient floor block, each intern has:

  • Three weeks of days
  • One five-day stretch of nights (Sunday to Thursday)
  • Two weekends off per month
  • Five to seven late nights per four-week block (stay until 8 pm – sign out is 4-5 pm on other days)

Interns have limited cross-coverage of floors on weekends while on well baby, community pediatric ambulatory, adolescent, and elective rotations––approximately two to three shifts per month.

The PGY-2 and PGY-3 curriculum focuses on establishing and augmenting the individualized curriculum to help you realize and build on your career goals. You will have many elective opportunities and the ability to work closely with a faculty mentor.

The senior resident curriculum also focuses on supervisory and teaching roles. During both the PGY-2 and PGY-3 year, the resident will have one floor senior block and one NICU block where they will be in a supervisory position. Residents also have one month rotations in the PICU, during both years.

Residents in both years spend full days in their continuity clinic except when on the floor, ICU rotations, and teaching resident rotation. Residents will also have a block of time each year for their Community Pediatric Ambulatory rotation. During the PGY-3 year, each resident has a teaching block where they focus specifically on medical student and house staff pediatric medical education.

PGY-2 and PGY-3 Call Schedule

The senior resident schedule is a call-based schedule. Our schedules comply ACGME duty hour rules. Senior residents work no more than 27 hours (24 patient care and three transition) during a call and get one day off per week. During floor senior month, NICU month, and PICU month, residents have a modified schedule to allow for two weekends off per month, and have a total of seven calls per month. There is cross coverage of floors during PICU and NICU and while on elective, Developmental Pediatrics, and teaching rotations. There are five to seven calls per month (including sick call). Residents get one call free month as a PGY-3. There are no in-hospital overnight calls while on Ambulatory or Transport rotations.