Categorical Residency

After three years of training in Internal Medicine, our residents are fully prepared for any career in medicine they chose to pursue. Each year of training adds progressively more responsibility for both the care of patients and teaching less-experienced learners.

As a PGY1, you will be exposed to the breadth and depth of Internal Medicine. You will spend on average two months on the General Medicine floors, admitting both routine and unusual cases. You will begin to learn HIV medicine on our inpatient services for four weeks and Cardiology for another month. You will get the opportunity to fine-tune your neurology examination skills with two weeks on the neurology consult service. All interns have two weeks of electives in Endocrinology to obtain exposure to this subspecialty. Our interns develop skills in the care of critically ill patients in both the CCU and the Medical ICU. A month at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) affords the opportunity to be exposed to quaternary-level cancer care.

A typical PGY1 Schedule is as follows:

PGY1

Weeks

Gen Med Floors

4-8

Specialty Floors

8-10

MSKCC

4

Elective/Research

2

Night Float

4-6

MICU

4-6

CCU

2-4

Ambulatory Care

12-14

Vacation

4

Consults

4


Our PGY2s gain more responsibility for patient care and supervision of their team on the General Medicine floors and subspecialty teams (HIV, Cardiology). Half of the class has an additional opportunity to rotate through MSKCC. One full month is spent in the ED and Critical Care units to build confidence in our residents to care for critically ill patients.

A typical PGY2 Schedule is as follows:

PGY2

Weeks

Gen Med Floors

6-10

Specialty Floors

4-8

MSKCC

4

ER

4

Selective

6

Elective/Research

6

MICU

4-8

CCU

2-8

Night Float

4

Ambulatory Care

12-14

Vacation

4


As a PGY3, the formative experience is the time spent as the screening consult resident who is the liaison for patients going to the ICU and the medical consult resident who provides consultation to other services in the hospital. Seniors also spend time on the floors and in the critical care units to consolidate their leadership skills. Time is allocated for you to customize your schedule based upon your particular career interests.

A typical PGY3 Schedule is as follows:

PGY3

Weeks

Gen Med Floors

 4-8

Specialty Floors

2-4

MICU

2-4

Selective

6-8

Elective/Research

8

ICU Screens

2-4

Medical Consult

2-4

Ambulatory Care

12-14

Vacation

4

Our categorical residents spend approximately 25% of their time in the outpatient setting.  It is during their ambulatory blocks that residents have the unique opportunity to serve as primary care providers for a panel of patients at one of three community-based centers.  These centers are part of the William F. Ryan Community Health Network, a Federally Qualified Health Center accredited by the Joint Commission and an NCQA Level 3 Patient-Centered Medical Home, which provides high quality care to vulnerable, under- and uninsured populations.  Additional time is spent in the outpatient subspecialty clinics, such as Cardiology, Gastroenterology, Nephrology, Pulmonary, Rheumatology and Endocrinology.

Complementing this extensive outpatient clinical exposure, we offer a rich, weekly academic half-day that includes seminars in core topics of primary care medicine, evidence-based medicine, and wellness sessions. Our residents also have an additional academic half-day each block for Art and Practice sessions, which focus on physician communication skills and transition-to-practice content.  Woven throughout the block is our robust quality improvement curriculum which includes real-time, resident-driven project implementation, classroom didactics, and online certification modules.  Finally, it is during the ambulatory blocks that residents engage in Simulation Lab activities.  

The Internal Medicine Residency Program at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s-West recognizes the unique skillset required of primary care physicians to practice in our current healthcare landscape.  As such, we are thrilled to offer an innovative Primary Care Track for residents seeking to become experts in primary care medicine.  Through this track, residents gain enhanced exposure to topics beyond those typically covered in the traditional ambulatory block.  The track is fully integrated into our categorical program; Primary Care Track residents engage in the same rotations as their colleagues, including the Intensive Care Units, yet are provided increased elective time dedicated to primary care-related activities.
The track is composed of clinical and non-clinical experiences as well as weekly half-day didactic sessions during Primary Care elective blocks.  Our outstanding faculty, who are committed to educating and mentoring the next generation of primary care physicians, bring to the table a broad range of clinical and academic interests. From the beginning of the PGY1 year, each Primary Care Track trainee is paired with a faculty member who will serve as their mentor for the duration of training.  Through this track we aim to provide general skills training while supporting each resident in their particular area of interest within primary care.
Features of our Primary Care Track include:

  • Exposure to a multitude of primary care-relevant clinical opportunities
  • Protected didactic sessions and workshops focused on primary care medicine topics
  • One-on-one faculty mentorship
  • Home visits with the nationally renowned Visiting Doctors Program at Mount Sinai
  • Exposure to innovative practice models
  • Longitudinal project engagement
  • Individually-tailored elective schedules as PGY2 and PGY3


The training schedule is as follows:

PGY1: (3 elective blocks) PGY1’s in the track will have the opportunity to engage in a broad range of relevant clinical rotations including; Women’s health, musculoskeletal medicine, home visits, dermatology, and exposure to innovative primary care practices.  All PGY1’s will maintain a practice at the Ryan Adair Center in Central Harlem, located in a HRSA-designated medically underserved area, which will allow exposure to a diverse population with a multitude of complex diseases.  Educational sessions for PGY1’s cover a broad array of topics introducing residents to the fundamentals of primary care medicine such as health care policy and practice models, population health and empanelment, physician communication skills, musculoskeletal exam skills, coding and billing, behavioral health integration, hands-on procedural sessions in the Simulation Lab, ethics, reflection rounds, cultural competency, and geriatric medicine.

PGY2: (3 + elective blocks) PGY2’s in the track have the opportunity to participate in the sessions above in addition to crafting a more tailored schedule focused on their particular area of interest.  Additional independent study time is allotted to allow residents to develop a longitudinal project with a focus on one aspect of comprehensive care.  Such projects can include quality improvement initiatives, advocacy, and curriculum development and will be overseen by faculty mentors, with the goal of presenting the work to a broader academic audience.

PGY3: (3+ elective blocks) PGY3’s in the track will devote time to independent projects and individually-tailored clinical experiences, as well as hone their leadership and teaching skills through Resident-as-Preceptor sessions in the outpatient resident clinics.  In addition, transition-to-practice didactics and career seminars will provide guidance toward life after residency.  PGY3s will have the opportunity to lead some of the small group discussions for all PC Track residents centered on a topic of their choosing.

Applicants interested in the Primary Care Track should apply using our ERAS number and select Primary Care as a track.  For further questions, please contact the Primary Care Track Director, Dr. Tamara Goldberg at tamara.goldberg@mountsinai.org.

 

 

Regina Gorman PGY3
Having grown up in Florida and doing all of my schooling there, once I matched, I was nervous about moving to a new city and starting residency. The amount of support that the program gave me, and the friendliness of all of my co-residents made something that could have been a very hard transition seem easy. I feel supported emotionally, but also, educationally. I'm never worried about asking for help, between the senior residents and the attendings, I know there is always someone there if I have a question, or just want to talk over a case with someone. Also, the chiefs have always been awesome at arranging events that foster a sense of community and family, while taking advantage of the great city in which we all live.

Valeria Santibanez PGY2
How has being my experience as an IM Resident at Mt Sinai St Luke's/West Hospital?  Wonderfully challenging and rewarding. Residency in this program has exposed me to many different and unique challenges that has shaped me professionally, academically, and personally. When I look back I realize how much I have grown since being an intern I can't believe so much has happened in only one year. The program and its leadership has guided me and helped shape my career path. I am grateful I have the opportunity to be surrounded by such an amazing mentorship. From my co-residents to department heads every support received has being the key to helping me succeed. I chose a program without realizing I was going to gain a family and I cannot wait for the years to come and continue my training in this ideal setting.

Olufunke Adeusi PGY2
I joined the internal medicine residency program at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s – West in July 2016 and can honestly say that I have no regrets about choosing this program.
One of the many strengths of the program is the great camaraderie between all the residents regardless of PGY level. It feels like a second family. The faculty and administrative staff are very supportive and available to help with any personal or professional issues. The program leadership is also very accessible and always open to new suggestions aimed at making this great program even better. If I had to do it all over again, I would still choose this residency program.
The diverse patient population served by both hospitals has provided me with a challenging yet rewarding learning experience. With each rotation my clinical skills and knowledge have improved. I feel confident that this training program will prepare me for life in clinical medicine at the end of my residency.
Finally, there is no better place to study, live or work than in New York City. It is a vibrant and diverse city that offers entertainment and activities to match any personal interest.

Marcelo Hernandez PGY2
When making my decision about a residency program, getting the skills and knowledge to become a good clinician was really important to me. I want to be able to confidently manage complex clinical scenarios, and at the same time provide my patients with compassionate care. Certainly joining Mount Sinai St. Luke’s-West is bringing me closer to that goal. Being located in the west side of Manhattan, I feel that this is the perfect location to learn medicine. Both in the inpatient and outpatient settings, we get to take care of a very diverse and complex patient population; on top of that, we have opportunity to treat people from all over the U.S., and all over the world who is visiting NYC, which is amazing! The program leadership is always looking for ways to enhance our learning; an example of that is the recent addition of the Medical Education and Primary Care Tracks.
That being said, I believe that the greatest asset of this program is its people. Residency can be a challenging time. From day one my chief residents, seniors, and program leadership, have been extremely supportive, and willing to provide me with guidance. Getting to work with this amazing group of people is a privilege. For those reasons, choosing to train and SLW was one of the best decisions I could have made. I am confident that, this is a place where I can achieve my goals.

Sridevi Rajeeve PGY1
At the time of penning this blurb, I’m just another naïve ‘July Intern’. But the fact that I can wax eloquent on my Internal Medicine residency at Mount Sinai St. Luke-West now itself, speaks volumes about how much it has impressed me. Starting off on the residency trail, I often got feedbacks about what program to apply for and one of the earliest names I’d heard bounced about as a very strong program to train in with amazing academics, clinical exposure and Match rates was MSSLW (formerly SLR). My interview day experience erased any skepticism I had – starting with the interactive Morning Report, interviews itself and the tours which displayed both the busy hospitals. What I noticed that day was a sense of familial first-name-basis camaraderie among residents and even with faculty! Having been fortunate enough to Match here, I’ve been experiencing the same unconditional warmth and rapport with my intern class, residents, fellows and Attendings. We have 5 amazing Chiefs Residents who go to every length to make our onboarding process seamless and constantly keeps everyone in the loop of events. Approachable and knowledgeable residents have been at the forefront in helping us get acquainted with the system and daily flow of the hospitals. There is a lot going on didactically every day – Noon Conferences, M&Ms, Morning Reports, Grand Rounds and other conferences have been rich sources of learning. The sheer spectrum of clinical exposure poses a daunting challenge to one’s medical knowledge and multitasking skills so that at the end of each block, I emerge feeling more competent to handle things as they come by. Rotating in two large and busy academic hospitals that have been in the community since a century ago is a humbling and transformative experience. We get to see patients from every socio-demographic angle possible, being located at the heart of the world’s most metropolitan city with representation of nearly every country, culture and language! The ambulatory clinic experience is similarly a challenging one, where multitudes of patients from all walks of life establish continuity of care. There is every opportunity for advancement in any field – be it academia, clinical research, leadership, wellness etc. Outside the realms of medicine, soaking the ambience of all that New York City offers has been the materialization of a lifelong dream. Every day here is a novel learning experience in a conducive learning environment making you realize your true potential as future care-providers of the world.

Mohammad Ghanbar PGY1
Starting a residency program can always be overwhelming and often tough especially when in a new environment. However, at Mount Sinai St Luke’s-west we were welcomed and supported from the get go. The leadership reached out to us to ensure we have a comfortable and smooth start to the program, addressing any issues or questions we had early on. The ample amount of teaching opportunities, and well thought out and structured didactics have helped me immensely progress in my learning curve. Being a big class, I find myself able to reach out to any of my peers for advice and direction. Residency can take its toll on you physically and mentally, however, New York City offers a multitude of activities to help you unwind.  In short, if you are looking for a place to work where you feel valued, supported, successful and still manage to assemble a life outside work, then Mount Sinai St Luke’s-West is an excellent prospect.