Categorical Residency

After three years of training in Internal Medicine, our residents are fully prepared for any career in medicine they chose to pursue. Each year of training adds progressively more responsibility for both the care of patients and teaching less-experienced learners.

As a PGY1, you will be exposed to the breadth and depth of Internal Medicine. You will spend on average two months on the General Medicine floors, admitting both routine and unusual cases. You will begin to learn HIV medicine on our inpatient services for four weeks and Cardiology for another month. You will get the opportunity to fine-tune your neurology examination skills with two weeks on the neurology consult service. All interns have two weeks of electives in Endocrinology to obtain exposure to this subspecialty. Our interns develop skills in the care of critically ill patients in both the CCU and the Medical ICU. A month at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) affords the opportunity to be exposed to quaternary-level cancer care.

A typical PGY1 Schedule is as follows:

PGY1

Weeks

Gen Med Floors

4-8

Specialty Floors

8-10

MSKCC

4

Elective/Research

2

Night Float

4-6

MICU

4-6

CCU

2-4

Ambulatory Care

12-14

Vacation

4

Consults

4


Our PGY2s gain more responsibility for patient care and supervision of their team on the General Medicine floors and subspecialty teams (HIV, Cardiology). Half of the class has an additional opportunity to rotate through MSKCC. One full month is spent in the ED and Critical Care units to build confidence in our residents to care for critically ill patients.

A typical PGY2 Schedule is as follows:

PGY2

Weeks

Gen Med Floors

6-10

Specialty Floors

4-8

MSKCC

4

ER

4

Selective/Research

6

Elective/Research

6

MICU

4-8

CCU

2-8

Night Float

4

Ambulatory Care

12-14

Vacation

4


As a PGY3, the formative experience is the time spent as the screening consult resident who is the liaison for patients going to the ICU and the medical consult resident who provides consultation to other services in the hospital. Seniors also spend time on the floors and in the critical care units to consolidate their leadership skills. Time is allocated for you to customize your schedule based upon your particular career interests.

A typical PGY3 Schedule is as follows:

PGY3

Weeks

Gen Med Floors

 4-8

Specialty Floors

2-4

MICU

2-4

Selective/Research

6-8

Elective/Research

8

ICU Screens

2-4

Medical Consult

2-4

Ambulatory Care

12-14

Vacation

4

Each resident spends 30% of their time in our ambulatory blocks. Residents will take care of patients in their continuity care clinic for seven half-days per two-week block. Residents are afforded the opportunity to develop their own patient panel and participate in quality improvement projects, including a performance audit of their own patient care. Additional time is spent in the subspecialty clinics, such as Nephrology, Asthma, Rheumatology and Gastroenterology.

A rich, didactic half-day includes seminars in Evidence-Based Medicine, Ambulatory Morning Report as well as geriatrics conferences. It is during your ambulatory blocks that you spend significant time training in the Simulation lab. Our unique workshops on communication skills also take place during the Ambulatory Block as well as teaching of the ACP’s High-Value, Cost Conscious Care curriculum. Lastly, housestaff are given protected time to complete two assigned modules from the Hopkins online curriculum.

For the academic year 2017-2018, we are excited to offer a new Primary Care Track to give our residents a solid foundation in Internal Medicine with enhanced exposure to outpatient care. New York City has one of the most diverse patient populations in the world, and we are able to take advantage of that diversity through Medical Home and Care Management programs, which expose our trainees to patient interactions that go beyond regular office visits.

Our outstanding Primary Care faculty, who are committed to educating and mentoring the next generation of Primary Care physicians bring to the table a broad range of clinical and academic interests, including patient outcomes, quality improvement in the outpatient setting, population health, transitional medicine, innovations in primary care, and evaluation of the pre-operative patient, to name a few. Every Primary Care trainee is paired 1:1 with a faculty member, and our own Chair of Medicine, Dr. Samuel L. Seward, Jr., a General Internist himself, is extensively involved with building robust primary care practices.

The Primary Care housestaff will work with the Categorical Internal Medicine residents with the same 6 + 2 model and will participate in the same enhanced curriculum like rich, didactic half-day seminars and in unique workshops as well as training in the simulation center. In addition, residents will have enhanced exposure with additional rotations in the outpatient arena during their consult and elective blocks. The Primary Care experience will be based at Ryan Community Care Center, a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC). In addition, rotations at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s enrich residents' experience in a non-FQHC setting, thus providing training in both models of outpatient care.

Residents will take care of patients in their continuity care clinic for seven half-days per two-week block. Residents have the opportunity to develop their own patient panel and participate in quality improvement projects, including a performance audit of their own patient care. 

Session Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
AM Sub-specialty Primary Care Didactic Session Primary Care Primary Care
PM Online Modules Primary Care Sub-specialty Didactic Session Online Modules

 

 

 

During PGY2 and PGY3 years, there is an increase in time spent in ambulatory blocks so trainees can do team-based QI and research projects. The track fulfills requirements for American Board of Internal Medicine eligibility.

 

Shawn Lee, MD, PGY2

My experience at Mount Sinai St. Luke's and Mount Sinai West has been wonderful. The chief residents and program leadership have been extremely supportive with personal problems, academic endeavors, and they do their best to guide you in your interests. I have had great success in speaking with and forming relationships with many different attending physicians and the advice from my senior residents here has been priceless. Living in New York City while doing residency has also been a dream come true. I have been exposed to a diversity of medical cases and while I often find myself busy, New York City has everything you can ask for once work is over.

Jasmine S. Beria, DO, MPH, PGY3

Since starting my residency here at Mt. Sinai St. Luke's- West, I can honestly say that the environment provides a great balance between being challenging, rewarding and fun.  Here I have been fortunate to have the opportunity to work with a diverse patient population at both hospitals with a multitude of unique medical conditions.  I have felt that my clinical skills have grown immensely over the years, and I continue to be a lifelong learner with the guidance of my senior residents and fellows who are exceptionally approachable and knowledgeable.  There is always someone there to turn to for guidance as you gain experience and become more independent.  The camaraderie that we have developed across all levels of training has allowed me to never feel alone, and that in itself is more than I could have ever asked for within a residency program.  We have indeed underwent major transitions and changes, however they have provided multiple valuable innovations towards an effort in making this program one that provides exemplary training to become well-rounded and seasoned physicians - ultimately delivering comprehensive care. Lastly, I cannot think of a better place than New York City that combines my academic interests with great opportunities to enjoy life outside the hospital.

Maryum Hussain, MD, PGY3

I was only ten years old, when I first decided I would study medicine and become a doctor. Although I grew up surrounded by doctors of various specialties in my family, my decision was of my own accord. My passion, I believe, was essentially a product of my environment. A citizen of a country with limited resources, abject poverty and illiteracy, I decided early on that serving the underprivileged would be my mission in life. In my medical school, I was trained at the largest government-run tertiary care center of my city for three years, where I came across helpless faces from impoverished backgrounds on a daily basis.

Upon completion of medical school, I devoted my time to study for all the three steps of USMLE exams and was fortunate to get accepted to do observerships in American hospitals. From the start of my medical school to studying for USMLE exams and traveling to the USA alone, I have left no stone unturned in pursuing my lifelong dream of obtaining my post graduate degree from the USA. Getting matched at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West was like a dream come true. My interview experience was phenomenal and I was thrilled to meet the faculty and residents on my interview day. I would like to highlight that I am one of the few girls from Pakistan, lucky to have come so far in the process. It’s an honor for me to be a member of the Mount Sinai community.

Shaun Noronha, MD, PGY3

I came to St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West as a next step in my dream of changing the world. After finishing medical school, I worked with an NGO in India for a year dedicated to reducing infant mortality in tribal populations. A fulfilling year later, I decided to turn my attention globally. I earned my MPH in Health Policy from Harvard and then went to work on CapacityPlus, a global USAID project based in Washington, DC to strengthen medical and nursing education in the developed world. Having worked extensively in many countries, I chose to do this residency in Internal Medicine at St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West. I was particularly attracted by the diverse patient population we see every day and by the strong focus on clinical excellence.