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Calvin Eng

  • ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Medicine, Cardiology
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Specialty

Certifications

  • Cardiovascular Disease

  • American Board of Internal Medicine

Education

  • MD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

  • Residency, Internal Medicine
    Bronx Municipal Hospital Center

  • Residency, Internal Medicine
    Bronx Municipal Hospital Center

  • Fellowship, Cardiology
    Mount Sinai Hospital

  • Fellowship, Cardiology
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Publications

French D, Coller B, Usher S, Berkowitz R, Eng C, Seligsohn U, Peretz H. Prenatal diagnosis of Glanzmann thrombasthenia using the polymorphic markers BRCA1 and THRA1 on chromosome 17. Br J Haematol 1998 Jul; 102(2): 582-7.

Glanzmann thrombasthenia is an autosomal recessive bleeding disorder caused by mutations in the genes encoding platelet GPIIb or GPIIIa. Both genes map to chromosome 17q21 and polymorphisms within this chromosomal region have been identified. In the current study, prenatal diagnosis was performed for a family that already had one affected child, patient 1, who had a compound heterozygous mutation in GPIIb. At the time of prenatal diagnosis, the maternal GPIIb mutation had been identified but the paternal GPIIb mutation was unknown. By sequence analysis, the fetus was identified as a carrier of the mother's mutation. To determine the probability of the fetus inheriting the father's mutation, haplotype analysis of DNA samples from the fetus, mother, father and affected child were performed using polymorphic markers on chromosome 17q12-q21. These markers included polymorphisms within the thyroid hormone receptor alpha1 gene (THRA1), the breast cancer gene (BRCA1), GPIIb, GPIIIa, and an anonymous marker D17S579. Heterozygosity within the THRA1, BRCA1 and GPIIIa polymorphic markers predicted that the fetus carried the father's normal allele. Based on genetic linkage studies, no recombination was identified with any of the informative markers, and from the map distance between GPIIb and BRCA1 the accuracy of diagnosis was predicted to be >98%. The father's mutation was subsequently identified and direct sequence analysis of fetal DNA confirmed that the fetus did not inherit the fathers' mutant allele.

Industry Relationships

Physicians and scientists on the faculty of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai often interact with pharmaceutical, device and biotechnology companies to improve patient care, develop new therapies and achieve scientific breakthroughs. In order to promote an ethical and transparent environment for conducting research, providing clinical care and teaching, Mount Sinai requires that salaried faculty inform the School of their relationships with such companies.

Dr.Eng is not currently required to report Industry relationships.

Mount Sinai's faculty policies relating to faculty collaboration with industry are posted on our website at http://icahn.mssm.edu/about-us/services-and-resources/faculty-resources/handbooks-and-policies/faculty-handbook. Patients may wish to ask their physician about the activities they perform for companies.

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