Brain Tumors

The Mount Sinai Health System provides comprehensive treatment by brain tumor specialists-neurosurgeons, neurologists, and oncologists-dedicated to improving the quality of life and extending the survival rate of patients with brain tumors through a team approach and individualized patient care.

Our doctors have expertise in:

  • Skull base tumors
  • Pituitary and neuroendocrine tumors
  • Benign meningiomas and cranial nerve tumors
  • Acoustic neuromas
  • Primary and metastatic brain tumors
  • Glioblastoma and astrocytoma
  • Minimally invasive and transnasal endoscopic tumor removal
  • Stereotactic radiosurgery
  • Neuro-oncology
  • Clinical trials for malignant brain tumors
  • Radiation oncology
  • Medical physics
  • Neuropathology
  • Pediatric brain tumors

Treatments

Our program offers an interdisciplinary approach that includes team members from the Departments of Neurosurgery, Neurology, Radiation Oncology, Pediatrics, and Rehabilitation Medicine, to ensure the highest quality of care. Our physicians employ the most advanced evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment techniques available, including computer-assisted, image-guided tumor resections and biopsies, advanced skull-base approaches, and minimally invasive endoscopic procedures.

Our highly advanced, stereotactic radiosurgery program gives patients a treatment option that does not require open surgery.

Research

With support from the National Institutes of Health, private foundations and industry, The Friedman Brain Institute investigates promising new therapies to treat brain tumor cells, as well as focuses on new treatments to ensure that brain tumors do not return (adjuvant therapies). Through these efforts, The Friedman Brain Institute has become a leader in brain cancer research and frontline clinical trials, developing better therapies for both malignant and benign brain tumors. Learn more

Our research extends to the training of future leaders in the field of brain tumor specialists. We are the first in the United States to use the NeuroTouch virtual-reality simulator. The device uses 3-D software coupled with handheld surgical controls that provide tactile feedback to closely mimic an actual brain surgery. The NeuroTouch, currently in its nascent phase of development, shows promise in developing and promoting many of the skill sets currently utilized by neurosurgery residents. In addition, it provides practice in a wide range of neurosurgical techniques. Similar to the laparoscopic simulators, this "first-of-its-kind" device may  one day become an integral part of the training of the 21st century neurosurgeon.