Research and Outreach

 Improving CRC Screening for Diverse Hispanics in an Urban Primary Care Setting

ID Number 08-1159

Principal Investigator(s)
Lina H. Jandorf, MA

Department(s) or Division(s)
Oncological Sciences

Description

Colonoscopy is the best way to screen for cancerous and pre-cancerous condition in the colon and has helped decrease the number of people who develop colorectal cancer (CRC). Low income minority groups tend to have lower rate of participation in screening, particularly among Hispanics. In 2004 we implemented a program of patient navigation (PN), which utilized a Hispanic health educator navigator who integrated culturally sensitive and linguistically congruent targeted messages.  The results showed that the PN program effectively increased screening colonoscopy (SC) adherence among low income urban African American and Hispanic patients.  The goal of this project is to test a culturally relevant intervention for diverse Hispanics to increase their rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening via colonoscopy.  Phase I of the study consists of using focus groups to assess draft brochures for information and organization.  Phase II is a randomized clinical trial (RCT) which will randomized participants into 3 arms: 1) culturally targeted CRC print materials plus best clinical practices, 2) standard CRC print materials plus best clinical practices, or 3) best clinical practices only on participation in colonoscopy.  

Contact Information
Lina Jandorf
(212) 659-5506
lina.jandorf@mssm.edu

Recruiting Patients: Yes


 Assessment of Barriers and Facilitators to Participating in Cancer Clinical Trials Among Cancer Patients

Principal Investigator(s)
Lina H. Jandorf, MA

Department(s) or Division(s)
Oncological Sciences

Description

A clinical trial is a research study that attempts to find better ways to prevent, diagnose and/or treat a specific disease.  The goal is to advance medicine by finding ways to help prevent the development of a disease, treat the disease and hopefully fine a cure.  A main issue is finding enough people who are willing to participate in the clinical trials.  This pilot study is assessing factors that contribute to participation in clinical trials among individuals with cancer within New York State.  We will survey individuals with cancer, as well as health professionals who may interact with individuals with cancer.   The results we obtain through the study can be used to design effective and meaningful programs and materials for cancer patients, as well as provide information for physicians and health care providers on how to better inform patients about clinical trials, thereby increasing patient awareness about, access to and participation in clinical trials.  This study is closed to recruitment, but analysis of data and findings is ongoing.

Contact Information
Lina Jandorf
(212) 659-5506
lina.jandorf@mssm.edu 
Recruiting Patients: No


 Minority Outreach, Recruitment and Education Core (MORE)

Principal Investigator(s)
Lina H. Jandorf, MA

Department(s) or Division(s)
The Tisch Cancer Institute

Description

The Minority Outreach, Recruitment and Education (MORE) Core of The Tisch Cancer Institute was developed to support our commitment to both our communities and our cutting-edge research efforts. Focusing on East and Central Harlem, MORE is devoted to the needs of our neighborhoods and to supporting the mission of The Tisch Cancer Institute. Our outreach efforts currently focus on reducing health care disparities through increased screening efforts, focusing on breast, cervical, skin and colorectal cancer. Recruitment efforts include educating community members as well as patients about the role of clinical research and how they might participate. Through our education efforts, we seek to bring cancer educational programs to community members. All of the work of MORE is supported by lay health advocates; community members trained to educate and enlist their peers in our outreach, recruitment and education efforts.

Recruiting Participants
Participants are currently being referred for several studies within the MORE Core.


 The Witness Project® of Harlem

ID Number 00-1219

Principal Investigator(s)

Lina H. Jandorf, MA

Department(s) or Division(s)
Oncological Sciences

Description

The Witness Project® of Harlem (WPH) represents a culturally sensitive educational effort that requires collaboration with the church, a powerful and far-reaching institution in the African American community.  This program has been modeled after the Witness Project® developed by Dr. Deborah Erwin and her associates at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.  The Witness Project® is a culturally competent breast and cervical cancer education program for African American women designed to increase adherence to recommended screening guidelines.  The Project trains breast cancer survivors (Witness Role Models (WRMs)), to share their own experience of cancer diagnosis and treatment.  Additionally, Lay Health Advisors (LHAs) are trained to work with the WRMs in the education component of the program.  Evaluation of the Witness Project® has revealed that participants report significant increases in breast cancer screening from pre-to post intervention as compared to a control group.
We are actively looking for sites to conduct programs, such as churches, schools, senior centers, or homes.  We are actively looking for African American women who have been touched by Breast or Cervical Cancer to work as program volunteers.

Contact Information
Lina Jandorf
(212) 659-5506
lina.jandorf@mssm.edu

Recruiting Participants: Yes


 Esperanza y Vida® - The Latina Witness Project of Harlem

ID Number 04-0805-02002

Principal Investigator(s)
Lina H. Jandorf, MA

Department(s) or Division(s)
Oncological Sciences

Description

Esperanza y Vida® (EyV) represents a culturally sensitive health educational program that works collaboratively with many different community and faith-based organizations within the Hispanic/Latino community.  This program has been modeled after the Witness Project® developed by Dr. Deborah Erwin and her associates at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.  The program uses creative and innovative technology in order to educate the communities about breast and cervical cancer.  The program was designed not only to increase knowledge about the topic, but also to improve adherence to recommended screening guidelines.  The Project trains breast cancer survivors (Sobrevivientes), to share their own experience of cancer diagnosis and treatment.  Additionally, Lay Health Advisors (LHAs) are trained to work with the sobrevivientesin the educational component of the program.  The research component of Esperanza y Vida® has shown that those participants who were navigated after the educational component of the program, report significant increases in breast and cervical cancer screening.  

We are actively looking for sites to conduct programs, such as churches, schools, senior centers, or homes.  We are actively looking for Spanish-speaking Hispanic/Latina women who have been touched by Breast or Cervical Cancer to work as program volunteers.

Contact Information
Lina Jandorf
(212) 659-5506
lina.jandorf@mssm.edu

Recruiting Participants: Yes


 Hope and Life®

Hope and Life

Principal Investigator(s)
Lina Jandorf, MA

Department(s) or Division(s)
Oncological Sciences

Description

Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer which equally affects both African American men and women. Although incidence rates have been decreasing over the years, they still remain higher for African American men and women compared to whites. Colorectal cancer screenings, such as colonoscopy, can save lives through early detection and prevention. Therefore, Hope and Life® is a culturally sensitive health educational program that was developed to address this health disparity that exists within the African American/Black community. Hope and Life works collaboratively with community and faith-based organizations within the African American/Black community. Modeled after the Witness Project® and Esperanza y Vida® it uses creative and innovative technology in order to educate the communities about colorectal cancer and early detection. The program was designed not only to increase knowledge about the topic, but also to improve adherence to recommended screening guidelines. Hope and Life®, trains role models, men and women who have had a colonoscopy, to share their own experience and feelings of undergoing a colonoscopy. Additionally, Lay Health Advisors are trained to work with the role models in the educational component of the program.

Recruiting Participants

We are actively looking for sites to conduct programs, such as churches, schools, senior centers, or private homes. If you have had a colonoscopy and would like to uplift and share the good news that colorectal cancer screening can save lives, please contact us! Together we can help others learn more about colorectal cancer and reduce this health disparity.

Contact Information
Lina Jandorf
(212) 659-5506
lina.jandorf@mssm.edu


 Perceptions of and Barriers to Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening among African American and African Immigrants Urban Muslims

Principal Investigator(s)
Lina Jandorf, MA

Department(s) or Division(s)
Oncological Sciences

Description
In order to effectively combat the ethnic differences in survival and mortality of cancer due to screening non-adherence, interventions designed to increase cancer screening should reflect an understanding of the culture, norms, barriers and facilitators of screening among diverse ethnic and cultural groups.  Islam is the fastest growing religion in the U.S. with an estimated Muslim population just under 3 million, 27% of whom are African American.  In order to investigate the feasibility of developing a new culturally appropriate method for providing breast and cervical cancer education to the women of the growing Muslim community, this study aims to explore breast and cervical cancer screening rates and screening among African American and African immigrant Muslim women of Harlem, Central Harlem and East Harlem. Furthermore, it aims to explore the application of a faith based approach to breast and cervical cancer education for African-American and African immigrant Muslim women in Northern Manhattan.  The results will then inform the development of a breast and cervical cancer education program which will reflect the values and beliefs of Muslim women that can then be implemented with this underserved and under-studied population in New York City and other urban areas with significant, and growing, Muslim populations.

Contact Information

Lina Jandorf
(212) 659-5506
lina.jandorf@mssm.edu


 CRC Screening Thoughts and Feelings: Increasing Engagement of African Americans

ID Number:  11-1682

Principal Investigator(s)
Lina H. Jandorf, MA

Department(s) or Division(s)
Oncological Sciences

Description
Colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence is 20% higher and mortality rates are 18% higher in African Americans compared to Whites.  These differences in mortality by race/ethnicity are largely accounted for by the later stage at diagnosis, making effective screening and early detection for African Americans a critical strategy for reducing disparities in CRC morbidity.  In order to better understand factors influencing the decisions of African Americans to engage or not engage in CRC screening, this study will test the ability of two interventions to positively impact decisions concerning health seeking and screening behaviors.  Survivor stories and other forms of narrative communication are recognized as effective tools for increasing screening and health behaviors.  Using personal narratives can increase perceived risk by creating a feeling of similarity to and identity with the communicator.  Therefore, this study aims to examine the efficacy of a narrative communication-style group intervention compared to a standard, fact-based didactic intervention to influence African Americans’ engagement in colorectal cancer screening, including examining the degree to which the community interventions impact cognitive and affective decision making factors about health care seeking.

Recruitment of participants will begin in January 2014.

Contact Information
Lina Jandorf
(212) 659-5506
lina.jandorf@mssm.edu


Contact Us

Lina Jandorf, MA
Tel: 212-659-5506
Fax: 212-849-2566
Send e-mail

One Gustave L. Levy Place
Box 1130
New York, NY 10029-6574