Medical Xpress - "Five Health Indicators Are Enough To Predict Cardiovascular Risk In Healthy People"

New York, NY
 – November 13, 2017  –– 

In a large population study that was the first of its kind, researchers found that a simple tool not requiring laboratory tests, the Fuster-BEWAT score, is as effective as the American Heart Association-recommended Ideal Cardiovascular Health Index (ICHS), which includes blood analysis of cholesterol and glucose. The Fuster-BEWAT score evaluates five health indicators: blood pressure, physical activity, body-mass index, fruit and vegetable intake, and smoking status, and does not require a blood test. Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, CNIC, and other institutions studied 3,983 middle-aged participants without prior cardiovascular disease who were employees of the Banco de Santander in Madrid. This is an ongoing observational prospective cohort study in which participants are being followed for 10 years. The results demonstrate the usefulness of the Fuster-BEWAT score for evaluating cardiovascular risk in situations where it is not possible to obtain blood samples. "The Fuster-BEWAT score may be particularly relevant in low-resource areas, such as developing countries, where the burden of cardiovascular disease is growing faster than in the rest of the world," said the study's corresponding author, Valentin Fuster, MD, professor of medicine and cardiology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, director of Mount Sinai Heart and physician in chief at the Mount Sinai Hospital. “The Fuster-BEWAT score is an easy, painless, inexpensive tool that could be implemented in resource-constrained health care settings to identify individuals with a high likelihood of subclinical atherosclerosis at whom preventative management strategies can be directed."

- Valentin Fuster, MD, Professor, Medicine, Cardiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Director, Mount Sinai Heart, the Zena and Michael A. Wiener Cardiovascular Institute and the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Center for Cardiovascular Health and Physician in Chief at Mount Sinai Hospital

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