General Internal Medicine

The Mount Sinai Division of General Internal Medicine (DGIM) encompasses much more than outstanding clinical care. Continuous quality improvement efforts, innovative care models, dynamic educational programs and health services research characterize the division. A personal and interdisciplinary approach involving colleagues and services in nursing, social work, medical and surgical subspecialties, psychiatry and rehabilitation is often used to diagnose, treat, manage, and heal the whole patient.  Mount Sinai DGIM is able to make referrals and coordinate care with a vast array of outstanding specialty services, and collaborate with them to create new models of care.

The merger with Mount Sinai’s clinical and academic division has led to the joining of a large primary care network and faculty at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s, as well as the creation of a new Division of General Internal Medicine at Mount Sinai Beth Israel. These divisions, in collaboration with the Primary Care Institute, will allow Mount Beth Israel’s and Mount Sinai St. Luke’s primary care sites to collaborate with the health system partners to improve patient outcomes and reduce unnecessary utilization through the development of standardized population health management protocols and clinical quality measures.

In addition to the outstanding primary care provided by highly experienced faculty and providers at the three sites, another major achievement over the last two years has been the large role DGIM leadership and faculty have taken in championing population health initiatives within the system. Population health management is an important step in the evolution of health care delivery. DGIM is using information technology and data systems to tailor entire clinical programs that better manage chronic illnesses and preventative care efforts, thereby improving patients’ overall health and decreasing health care costs. The ability to collaborate cross-institutionally, as well as cross-departmentally in The Mount Sinai Health System, has been especially productive in these efforts as pre-merger care coordination models have been complementary to existing models.  

The Division of General Internal Medicine has more than 50 active research studies across a broad range of patient and population-based research activities.