Conferences

Teaching Rounds

Teaching rounds, directed by the neurosurgical ICU director, are held in the ICU each Monday morning. All patients on the neurosurgical service are seen and discussed. Often, nonscheduled teaching rounds are performed with various attendings as time and operating room schedules permit. Twice daily, the Chief Residents lead patient rounds with all residents and students on service in attendance.

Neuroradiology teaching and work rounds are held three mornings each week at 7:00am. Every radiology study on patients pre- or post-op is reviewed and discussed with the goal of education in reading films and in understanding the diseases and surgical options.

Grand Rounds are held weekly Wednesday from 7:00-9:00am with formal presentations by faculty, visiting professors, residents, and students. They cover topics in neurosurgery, neurology, neuropathology, neuroradiology, basic and translational research, and other timely issues.

Journal Club is held once each month and is directed by an attending with a particular interest and expertise in the area under discussion. Articles on a particular topic are chosen and presented by the residents with open discussion about the merits of that paper.

Brain Tumor Board, coordinated by Isabelle Germano, MD, meets weekly on Thursdays from 9:00-10:00am. In this multidisciplinary meeting, patients with brain tumors are evaluated by physicians from the Departments of Neurosurgery, Neurology, Neuropathology, Neuroradiology, Radiation Oncology, Neoplastics, and Rehabilitation Medicine. Residents from these departments participate in the discussion of patients' management.

Spine Tumor Board, coordinated by  Arthur Jenkins, MD, and Isabelle Germano, MD, meets weekly on Fridays from 9:30-10:00am. In this multidisciplinary meeting, patients with spine tumors are evaluated by physicians from the Departments of Neurosurgery, Neurology, Neuropathology, Neuroradiology, Radiation Oncology, Neoplastics, and Rehabilitation Medicine. Residents from these departments participate in the discussion of patients' management.

A Basic Science/Clinical Correlation Course, coordinated by Thomas Naidich, MD, Professor of Radiology and Tanvir Choudhri, MD, Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery, meets each Friday 7:00-8:00am. The course covers a variety of topics in a programmatic fashion. In a three year cycle, the course reviews the anatomy and physiology of the cranial nerve (year one), spinal cord and peripheral nerves (year two), and the cerebrum and cerebellum (year three). The first three years included the following: In year one (2004-2005), approximately one month was devoted to each cranial nerve in weekly sessions as follows: Gross anatomy Neurosurgery resident); Neuroradiology of the specific cranial nerve and associated disorders (Neuroradiology Fellow); Neuroanatomy (Neurosurgery Resident); Clinical correlation (Neurosurgery or guest faculty). An example of the latter for cranial nerve II was the lecture entitled The Examination of the Visual Fields, presented by Joel Mindel, neuroophthalmologist and Professor of Ophthalmology at Mount Sinai. The final sessions on cranial nerves involved virtual and real dissections of the cranial nerve and brain stem. The cadaver dissections occurred in our department's microsurgical laboratory. The second-year (2005-2006) was focused on the vertebral column, spinal cord and peripheral nerves and involved review of gross and neuroanatomy as well as neurophysiology. The third-year (2006-2007), following the same weekly template, is concentrated on cerebrum and cerebellum: gross and microscopic neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and relevant neuroradiology. By gaining a thorough and comprehensive understanding of these topics, the residents at Mount Sinai will enhance their future clinical and research activities.

Neurosurgery Conference Schedule [PDF]

Brain Surgery Simulation Course

Mount Sinai neurosurgeons will be presenting in the European Association of Neurosurgical Societies annual meeting pre-congress courses in Prague, Czech Republic on October 12, 2014. Learn more