Program Structure and Curriculum

Program Structure

The Master of Science in Biomedical Science (MSBS) program at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS) is built around a classic model of rigorous coursework combined with the generation of new knowledge through research. The curriculum culminates in an original thesis that is defended orally. In order to receive MSBS students must:

  • Complete a full-time course of study with a minimum of 45 credits
  • Complete all degree requirements in three terms with an option to continue their research for a fourth term
  • Spend 25 hours per week in the laboratory completing thesis research
  • Successfully defend their thesis
  • Maintain an average of a B (3.0) or better in the Core Curriculum and a cumulative GPA of a B (3.0) or better

Curriculum

In the MSBS program, your time will be divided between coursework and research. You can select courses from our entire graduate school catalog, which includes courses in public health, clinical research techniques, and basic and translational sciences. In addition, three medical school courses are also open to MSBS students: immunology, medical physiology, and medical microbiology.

Students typically spend about 25 hours each week in the lab working on their thesis research. We provide support for MCAT or GRE preparation for your application to programs beyond the MSBS.

First Year

In your first year, you will take Biostatistics, Responsible Conduct in Research (RCR), a few electives and courses in a year-long core curriculum. There are three cores from which to choose:

Choose one of three (3) Cores

This core takes a traditional approach to teaching graduate level biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, and immunology.

Designed for students who want to use a systems-biology approach in their research, the first semester uses disease as a basis for studying biochemistry, molecular biology, and cell biology. The second semester is split between an introduction to pharmacology and an introduction to modeling complex biological systems.

This provides a foundational education in graduate-level biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, and immunology, but in the context of neurobiology. When studying cellular polarity, for instance, the neuron will be the model cell of study.

During the summer between the first and second years, students will focus on research. This is a time when your thesis project comes together and, in many cases, the bulk of your results are generated. While you are only expected to be in the lab 25 hours per week, many students are able to devote additional time, and this is often the most important and productive research time for your thesis work.

Second Year

A busy, but rewarding period, the third semester is dedicated to completing coursework and research projects, and writing and defending the thesis.

We offer the optional fourth semester because it gives students the opportunity to extend their coursework and can allow a bit of extra time to prepare for an entrance exam to another program. 

Apply Now

Priority Application Deadline: January 15, 2017
Final Application Deadline:
June 1, 2017