Why Choose Mount Sinai

Let’s face it – trying to decide where to spend your residency can be complicated and numerous factors play a role in that decision. But here at Mount Sinai, we offer a potent combination of a top-notch medical education, the opportunity to work with some of the world’s best clinicians and researchers, and robust career development and mentoring plus we are based in the greatest, most intellectually and culturally vibrant city in the world.

The Internal Medicine Residency Program at the Icahn School of Medicine was ranked 15th in a nationwide survey of Department Chairs and Program Directors that was published in U.S. News & World Report in 2014. The Icahn School of Medicine also ranks in the top 20 of all accredited U.S. Medical Schools, according to the 2015-16 U.S. News & World Report annual survey on "America’s Best Graduate Schools." We are also in the top 20 in NIH funding nationwide, according to the Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research.

In its “Best Hospitals” issue for 2015-16, U.S. News and World Report ranked multiple divisions in the Department of Medicine as leading locations for sub-specialty care, including Geriatrics (#3), Gastroenterology (#8), Cardiology (#7), Diabetes and Endocrinology (#21) and Nephrology (#23). These rankings exemplify our commitment to patient care and the education of our trainees.

Mount Sinai is unique because it is located at the crossroads of one of the richest areas in the United States and one of the poorest. This nexus allows for an amazingly diverse patient population that is both highly demanding and highly in need of medical services. And this offers you a unique opportunity for your training.

And of course, as a resident at Mount Sinai you will live in New York City — one of the greatest, most diverse and exciting cities in the world. Physically, our main campus is right next to Central Park, which provides a quick escape into natural beauty for runs, walks, bike rides or just relaxation. Students can participate in all the cultural and recreational activities that New York City can offer: theater, museums, music, restaurants, and sporting events.

With three main training locations, you will be exposed to a wide array of patients that most trainees don’t see until later in their careers.

Mount Sinai Hospital

Founded in 1852, The Mount Sinai Hospital is a 1,171-bed urban hospital known internationally for delivering the most sophisticated and advanced medical care available. The Mount Sinai Hospital provides primary and secondary care to local residents, as well as tertiary care to patients referred from around the world. Located on the borders of East Harlem, one of the poorest communities in the nation, and the Upper East Side, one of the wealthiest, Mount Sinai attracts an incredibly diverse patient population.

Elmhurst Hospital Center

Elmhurst Hospital is a 618-bed municipal hospital located in Queens. It maintains a tight affiliation with Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and many residents spend time at this facility. Elmhurst Hospital Center is located in the most ethnically diverse square mile in the world. There are over 100 translators on staff at Elmhurst for nearly 85 different languages. Because of this unique patient population, Elmhurst offers a very special opportunity to care for patients with diseases rarely seen in other hospitals in the United States. The hospital provides all levels of care to over one million residents of Western Queens. The emergency room and outpatient clinics are among the busiest in New York City.

James J. Peters Veterans Administration Medical Center

The VA Medical Center in the Bronx is the oldest VA facility in New York City, celebrating over 75 years of service to those who have served our country. Today the VAMC has 311 hospital beds and 120 nursing home beds and operates several regional referral points including a Spinal Cord Injury Unit. The rotation experience at the VMAC offers its unique patient population for teaching particularly in the fields of psychiatry, physical medicine and rehabilitation, neurology, oncology, geriatrics and palliative and extended care.

As a resident in the Department of Medicine at Mount Sinai, you will work with and be mentored by an amazing group of physicians. We have some of the leading clinicians, physician-scientists and researchers who will play an integral part in your development as a physician.  Please click here to read more about our faculty.

At Mount Sinai, we provide a well-rounded and comprehensive training program that encompasses all aspects of academic medicine. We consider it a point of pride that so many of our residents have not only published major papers by the time they leave us, but also end up in prestigious fellowship programs throughout the country and around the world.

Career Mentoring

Upon arrival as an intern, you are assigned an advisor within the program to provide semi-annual feedback including review of evaluations and career goals. This person serves as a mentor for your professional development throughout your three years at Mount Sinai. Seminars for residents regarding fellowship applications as well as future career planning are held regularly.

Research Opportunities

Under the direction of clinical and basic science research directors, research opportunities abound at Mount Sinai. Residents are required to participate in scholarly activity with a faculty member during the course of their training. The Department of Medicine ranks in the top 20 of NIH-funded academic medicine departments. A state-of-the-art core facility in genomic and proteomic medicine has facilitated the development of a broad Personalized Medicine Program that crosses all subspecialties and is centered in the Department of Medicine.

Starting in internship, you will meet with our APDs for research, Cardinale Smith, MD, MPH, and Steven Coca, DO, who will connect you to a research mentor who shares your particular interests. A directory of research opportunities is published annually by the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai with specific references to the research projects that welcome housestaff as participants. Research opportunities are also available in areas closely linked to primary care such as outcomes and quality of care research. Housestaff research efforts culminate in a Department of Medicine Research Day each spring when residents present their data in oral and poster format. A guest speaker is chosen each year to demonstrate the evolving role of translational science.

Clinical Electives

The elective months are an important part of the resident’s training. Not only can they help enrich the general medical training, but they can help residents gain insight into possible future careers. The Department of Medicine offers electives in Cardiology, Clinical Immunology, Endocrinology, Gastroenterology, General Internal Medicine, Geriatrics and Palliative Care Medicine, Hematology/Oncology, Hospital Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Liver Diseases, Medical Informatics, Nephrology, Pulmonary Medicine/Critical Care and Rheumatology. Residents can choose either inpatient consult or outpatient electives.

Fellowship and Beyond

A large majority of our residents successfully compete for the most prestigious fellowship positions. During fellowship applications, each resident is also assigned to a faculty mentor in their specialty of choice to help them with the challenges of applying to competitive fellowships. For the residents choosing to remain in primary care, we make special efforts to find general medicine fellowships for those wishing to gain further expertise or pursue careers in academic medicine.  Additionally, the Department of Medicine continues to work with its residents beyond their period of training, assisting them with career decisions after residency.

As a member of Mount Sinai's Internal Medicine Residency Program, you will have the chance to take part in unique medical curricula, which will further enhance your education. We have three main programs that are woven into your day-to-day training: Advancing Idealism in Medicine, Quality Improvement and Evidence Based Medicine

Advancing Idealism in Medicine

The Advancing Idealism in Medicine (AIM) program was initiated several years ago by the internal medicine housestaff. The program seeks to support and advance idealism in medicine during the demanding years of residency training. AIM enables residents to reframe how they perceive their patients, their profession and themselves. The goals of the program are accomplished through the following activities:

  • An AIM Lecture Series incorporated into Medical Grand Rounds at which invited leaders in health care inspire and educate residents on issues such as health policy, advocacy, human rights and global health care;
  • AIM lunch discussions which expose resident physicians to issues directly related to the humanistic aspects of the care they provide. Issues covered include death and dying, religion and medicine, global health, job burnout, work-life balance, environmental health and the physician's role as advocate for health as a human right;
  • Advocacy opportunities in which residents are encouraged to use their voice to promote humanism in medicine both within the hospital and outside for other communities in need;
  • Local community projects in which residents have the opportunity to provide health education to underserved communities in New York City in close collaboration with community organizations.

Quality Improvement

The ever-changing landscape in American health care requires that we train future leaders who have a firm foundation in the concepts of quality improvement and patient safety. Housestaff officers are exposed to the following throughout their training:

  • A monthly conference to highlight medical errors and discuss them openly and without blame, while performing a root cause analysis;
  • Quality improvement and patient safety projects that are actively encouraged and mentored in the housestaff quality committee. Grant funding is available for quality-related research projects;
  • Housestaff officers are provided with the same objective outcome and operational metrics as our attending staff each month, such as mortality, length of stay and readmission rates.

Evidence Based Medicine

Our training program emphasizes evidence-based medicine (EBM). The multiple components of our EBM curriculum are woven into the overall residency to optimize learning and retention. The EBM curriculum emphasizes skills in critical appraisal, filtered resource utilization and evidence summary. It includes small group journal clubs for interns and residents during outpatient rotations, EBM seminars for residents, small seminars in cost-effectiveness analysis and incorporation of EBM skills into inpatient morning report with daily presentation and critique of relevant articles.

The Mount Sinai Medical Center is located on the border of East Harlem, a community that has historically drawn new immigrants to New York City. The majority of East Harlem residents today belong to ethnic or racial groups that have traditionally been underrepresented in medicine. We want our physicians who provide exceptional care to that community to also reflect its diversity.

Training future leaders to address racial and ethnic disparities within medicine expands Mount Sinai’s and the department’s talent pool and helps improve health care access, quality of care, and health policy for underserved communities. To accomplish these goals and provide equal opportunities, we are committed to attracting those who historically have had difficulty entering the medical professions.

The Department of Medicine’s aggressive agenda for diversity goes beyond recruitment. Programmatic innovations focus on enhancing professional experiences and growth for our faculty and housestaff members from underrepresented minorities.

Research opportunities are available to address health care disparities, public policy, and issues in cultural competencies. Mount Sinai’s Center for Multicultural and Community Affairs provides extensive resources to help underrepresented minorities take the next steps in career development after their residencies are completed.