Photo of Carol Bodian

Carol Bodian

  • HONORARY LECTURER Anesthesiology
Print ProfilePrint Profile

Education

  • B.A., Barnard College
    Mathematics

  • M.S., Columbia University
    Biostatistics

  • Dr.P.H., Columbia University
    Biostatistics

Research

My work concerns biostatistical problems that arise in laboratory, epidemiological, and clinical research. research. I concentrate on\r\nmethods that are applicable to follow-up data, where varying periods of time elapse between the time that patient characteristics and/or\r\ntreatments are observed, and the outcome of interest is known. In particular, I have been working on studies about benign breast\r\ndiseases and other factors that may be risk indicators for developing breast cancer, and on risks of adverse outcomes among patients\r\nwith cardiothoracic abnormalities. I also work on statistical methods for assessing reliability and agreement among measurements or\r\nratings.

Publications

Keegan NJ, Yudkowitz FS, Bodian CA. Determination of the reliability of three scoring systems to evaluate children after general anaesthesia. Anesthesiology 1995; 50: 200-202.

Berger A, Bodian CA, Hirsch WM. On estimating incidence rates of diseases with delayed onset using biased samples. Journal of the American Statistical Association 1996; 91: 831-840.

Berger A, Bodian C, Hirsch WM. On estimating incidence rates of diseases with delayed onset using biased samples. Journal of the American Statistical Association 1996; 91: 831-840.

Rathan A, Weiser KR, Pritsker A, Itzkowitz S, Bodian C, Slater G, Weiss A, Burstein D. GLUT1 glucose transporter expression in colorectal carcinoma: a marker for poor prognosis. Cancer 1998 Jul 1; 83(1): 34-40.

BACKGROUND: Malignant cells exhibit increased glycolytic metabolism, and in many cases increased glucose transporter gene expression. The authors hypothesized that GLUT1 glucose transporter expression is increased in colorectal carcinoma, and that the degree of expression might have prognostic significance. METHODS: GLUT1 glucose transporter immunostaining was studied in normal colon and benign colon adenomas and in 112 colorectal carcinomas from patients for whom long term clinical outcome was known. RESULTS: GLUT1 immunostaining was absent in normal colorectal epithelium and tubular adenomas, and absent or only weakly apparent in tubulovillous adenomas. The majority of carcinomas (101 of 112; 90%) had GLUT1 immunostaining. Tumors from 92 patients had low GLUT1 expression ( 50% of cells were GLUT1 positive) and 9 of these patients (45%) died of disease during follow-up. Disease specific mortality was greater in patients with high GLUT1 tumors (relative risk of 2.4; P=0.02). In a multivariate analysis to assess whether high GLUT1 staining correlated with increased mortality independently of Dukes stage, the risk of death from colon carcinoma in the group with high GLUT1 staining was 2.3 times that in the group with low GLUT1 staining, a difference that approached statistical significance (P=0.07). CONCLUSIONS: GLUT1 glucose transporter expression is associated strongly with neoplastic progression in the colon, and assessment of the extent of GLUT1 immunostaining in colorectal carcinoma identifies patients with a poorer prognosis.

Beilin Y, Galea M, Zahn J, Bodian C. Epidural ropivacaine for the initiation of labor epidural analgesia: a dose finding study. Anesth Analg 1999 Jun; 88(6): 1340-5.

The purpose of our study was to determine the lowest concentration of ropivacaine that offers pain relief for the initiation of labor epidural analgesia. Women in active labor were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, double-blinded study to receive either ropivacaine 0.20% (Group I), ropivacaine 0.15% (Group II), or ropivacaine 0.10% (Group III). After placement of the epidural catheter, 13 mL of the study medication was administered. Fifteen minutes later, the adequacy of analgesia was assessed. If the woman reported that her degree of analgesia was not adequate, an additional 5 mL of the study medication was given, the degree of pain relief was reassessed 15 min later, and the study was concluded. A sequential study design was used to assess the success rates. We found that 26 of 28 (93%) women in Group I had adequate analgesia, compared with only 18 of 28 (64%) in Group II (P = 0.014) and 4 of 12 (33%) in Group III (P = 0.003). We conclude that ropivacaine 0.20% offers adequate analgesia significantly more often than either ropivacaine 0.15% or ropivacaine 0.10%. If one selects ropivacaine as the sole local anesthetic for the initiation of labor epidural analgesia, the minimal concentration should be 0.20%. IMPLICATIONS: The lowest effective concentration of ropivacaine for the initiation of labor epidural analgesia has not been determined. We found that ropivacaine 0.20% offers adequate analgesia significantly more often than either ropivacaine 0.15% or ropivacaine 0.10%. If one selects ropivacaine as the sole local anesthetic for the initiation of labor epidural analgesia, the minimal concentration should be 0.20%.

Beilin Y, Bodian C, Mukherjee T, Andres L, Vincent RD, Hock DL, Sparks AE, Munson AK, Minnich ME, Steinkampf MP, Christman GM, McKay RS, Eisenkraft J. The use of propofol, nitrous oxide, or isoflurane does not affect the reproductive success rate following gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT): a mul. Anesthesiology 1999 Jan; 90(1): 36-41.

BACKGROUND: Whether anesthetic agents administered during gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) affect reproductive outcome is controversial. This multicenter pilot trial and survey had two purposes: to evaluate the effect of propofol, nitrous oxide, midazolam, and isoflurane on pregnancy outcome after GIFT, and to determine if a larger prospective, randomized study is warranted. METHODS: A written invitation was mailed to all 50 fertility programs in the United States that are members of the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology and perform more than 30 GIFT procedures per year. They were invited to contribute information from the medical records of women who underwent GIFT during the calendar years 1993 and 1994. They were asked to document whether propofol, nitrous oxide, midazolam, a potent inhaled anesthetic agent was used during the GIFT procedure; if the woman became pregnant; and if she delivered at least one live neonate. RESULTS: Seven medical centers participated and contributed data from 455 women. The clinical pregnancy rate (number of pregnancies/total number of GIFT procedures) and the delivery rate (number of women who delivered at least one live baby/total number of GIFT procedures) were 35% and 32%, respectively. A statistically significant difference could not be found in the clinical pregnancy or delivery rates between those women who received propofol, nitrous oxide, midazolam, or isoflurane during GIFT and those who did not. CONCLUSIONS: No agent-related differences in pregnancy rates were found when propofol, nitrous oxide, isoflurane, or midazolam was used as part of the anesthetic technique for GIFT. Therefore, a more extensive prospective trial does not appear to be warranted.

Beilin Y, Friedman, Jr F, Andres LA, Hossain S, Bodian CA. The effect of the obstetrician group and epidural analgesia on the risk for cesarean delivery in nulliparous women. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand 2000 Sep; 44(8): 959-964.

Industry Relationships

Physicians and scientists on the faculty of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai often interact with pharmaceutical, device and biotechnology companies to improve patient care, develop new therapies and achieve scientific breakthroughs. In order to promote an ethical and transparent environment for conducting research, providing clinical care and teaching, Mount Sinai requires that salaried faculty inform the School of their relationships with such companies.

Dr.Bodian is not currently required to report Industry relationships.

Mount Sinai's faculty policies relating to faculty collaboration with industry are posted on our website at http://icahn.mssm.edu/about-us/services-and-resources/faculty-resources/handbooks-and-policies/faculty-handbook. Patients may wish to ask their physician about the activities they perform for companies.

Edit profile in Sinai Central

Address

17 East 102 Street Floor 4th Floor Room Room D4-148
New York, NY 10029

Tel: 212-824-7112