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Jing Lin

  • ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Pediatrics, Newborn Medicine
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Certifications

  • Neonatal & Perinatal Medicine

Clinical Focus

Education

  • MD, Wenzhou Medical College

  • University of Miami
    Neonatology

  • Residency, Pediatrics
    Yuying Children's Hospital

  • Residency, Pediatrics
    New York University Medical Center

  • Fellowship, Neonatology
    Mount Sinai Hospital

Research

Dr. Lin's main research focus is on the role of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in the pathogenesis of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a disease mainly seen in premature infants and a source of significant morbidity and mortality in the NICU.  The existing data suggest that production of SCFAs in the bowel under normal conditions is very important for energy salvage and crucial for gastrointestinal adaptation and maturation; however, excessive SCFAs, especially butyrate, in the intestinal lumen can deregulate the normal process of apoptosis and may cause disruption of the intestinal barrier. The increased apoptosis can have a detrimental effect on intestinal barrier function. Once the intestinal barrier is disrupted, the inflammatory cascade may be activated, which can induce further injury to the intestinal mucosa including areas of the intestine distant from the initial disruption. Therefore overproduction/accumulation of SCFAs in the intestinal lumen may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of NEC. The experiments in Dr. Lin's lab are designed to elucidate the effects of butyrate on the intestinal mucosa barrier at different developmental stages and the underlying mechanisms, which may help us to further understand the important role of butyrate in postnatal intestinal barrier maturation and the pathogenesis of NEC. These insights may lead to the development of novel prevention strategies.

Publications

Xu Z, Chen Y, Yang M, Li W, Liu Q, Lin J. The epidemiological and clinical characteristics of measles in Wenzhou, China, 2000-2010. . Epidemiology and Infection 2014; 142: 20-27.

Bao S, Zhu L, Zhuang Q, Wang L, Xu P, Itoh K, Holzman I, Lin J. Distribution dynamics of recombinant Lactobacillus in the gastrointestinal tract of neonatal rats. . PLOS ONE 2013; 8: e60007.

Jia Y, Lin Z, Lv H, Li Y, Green R, Lin J. Effect of Delivery Room Temperature on the Admission Temperature of Premature Infants-A Randomized Controlled Trial. . J Perinatol 2013; 33: 264-7.

Adrouche-Amrani L, Green R, Gluck K, Lin J. Failure of a repeat course of cyclooxygenase inhibitor to close a PDA is a risk factor for developing chronic lung disease in ELBW infants.. BMC Pediatr 2012; 12(10).

Liu X, Zhou R, Pan Q, Jia X, Gao W, Wu J, Lin J, Chen J. Genetic inactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor attenuates pathological but not developmental angiogenesis in mouse retina. . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2010; 51: 6625-6632.

Chen S, Chen J, Cai X, Gao Y, Ge R, Wu H, Lin Z, Lin J. Perinatal exposure to di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate leads to restricted growth and delayed lung maturation in newborn rats. . J Perinat Med 2010; 38: 515-521.

Peng L, Li Z, Green R, Holzman I, Lin J. Butyrate Enhances the Intestinal Barrier by Facilitating Tight Junction Assembly via Activation of AMP Activated Protein Kinase in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers. . J Nutr ; 139: 1619-25.

Peng L, He Z, Chen W, Holzman I, Lin J. Effects of butyrate on intestinal barrier function in a Caco-2 cell monolayer model.. Pediatr Res 2007; 61: 37-41.

Lin Z, Yu H, Lin J, Chen S, Liang Z, Zhang Z. Mild hypothermia via selective head cooling as neuroprotective therapy in term neonates with perinatal asphyxia: an experience from a single neonatal intensive care unit. . J Perinatol 2006; 26: 180-184.

Lin J, Peng L, Itzkowitz S, Holzman I, Babyatsky M. Short-chain fatty acid induces intestinal mucosal injury in newborn rats and down-regulates intestinal trefoil factor gene expression in vivo and in vitro. . J Pediatr Gastr Nutr 2005; 41: 607-611.

Industry Relationships

Physicians and scientists on the faculty of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai often interact with pharmaceutical, device and biotechnology companies to improve patient care, develop new therapies and achieve scientific breakthroughs. In order to promote an ethical and transparent environment for conducting research, providing clinical care and teaching, Mount Sinai requires that salaried faculty inform the School of their relationships with such companies.

Dr. Lin did not report having any of the following types of financial relationships with industry during 2013 and/or 2014: consulting, scientific advisory board, industry-sponsored lectures, service on Board of Directors, participation on industry-sponsored committees, equity ownership valued at greater than 5% of a publicly traded company or any value in a privately held company. Please note that this information may differ from information posted on corporate sites due to timing or classification differences.

Mount Sinai's faculty policies relating to faculty collaboration with industry are posted on our website at http://icahn.mssm.edu/about-us/services-and-resources/faculty-resources/handbooks-and-policies/faculty-handbook. Patients may wish to ask their physician about the activities they perform for companies.

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Tel: 212-241-6186
Fax: 212-534-5207
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1176 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10029

Tel: 212-241-6186
Fax: 212-534-5207
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  • Chinese (Mandarin)