Categorical Residency

After three years of training in Internal Medicine, our residents are fully prepared for any career in medicine they chose to pursue. Each year of training adds progressively more responsibility for both the care of patients and teaching less-experienced learners.

As a PGY1, you will be exposed to the breadth and depth of Internal Medicine. You will spend on average two months on the General Medicine floors, admitting both routine and unusual cases. You will begin to learn HIV medicine on our inpatient services for four weeks and Cardiology for another month. You will get the opportunity to fine-tune your neurology examination skills with two weeks on the neurology consult service. All interns have two weeks of electives in Endocrinology to obtain exposure to this subspecialty. Our interns develop skills in the care of critically ill patients in both the CCU and the Medical ICU. A month at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) affords the opportunity to be exposed to quaternary-level cancer care.

A typical PGY1 Schedule is as follows:

PGY1

Weeks

Gen Med Floors

4-8

Specialty Floors

2-6

MSKCC

4

Elective/Research

2

Night Float

4-6

MICU

4-6

CCU

2-4

Ambulatory Care

13-14

Vacation

4

Consults

2


Our PGY2s gain more responsibility for patient care and supervision of their team on the General Medicine floors and subspecialty teams (HIV, Cardiology). Half of the class has an additional opportunity to rotate through MSKCC. One full month is spent in the ED and Critical Care units to build confidence in our residents to care for critically ill patients.

A typical PGY2 Schedule is as follows:

PGY2

Weeks

Gen Med Floors

6-10

Specialty Floors

4-8

MSKCC

4

ED

4

Consults

6

Elective/Research

8

MICU

4-8

CCU

2-8

Night Float

4

Ambulatory Care

12-14

Vacation

4


As a PGY3, the formative experience is the time spent as the screening consult resident who is the liaison for patients going to the ICU and the medical consult resident who provides consultation to other services in the hospital. Seniors also spend time on the floors and in the critical care units to consolidate their leadership skills. Time is allocated for you to customize your schedule based upon your particular career interests.

A typical PGY3 Schedule is as follows:

PGY3

Weeks

Gen Med Floors

4-8

Specialty Floors

2-4

MICU

2-4

Consults

6-8

Elective/Research

6

ICU Screens

2-4

Medical Consult

2-4

Ambulatory Care

12-14

Vacation

4

During their two-week ambulatory blocks, categorical residents have the unique opportunity to serve as primary care providers for a panel of patients at one of three community-based centers.  These centers are part of the William F. Ryan Community Health Network, a Federally Qualified Health Center accredited by the Joint Commission and an NCQA Level 3 Patient-Centered Medical Home, which provides high quality care to vulnerable, under- and uninsured populations.  Additional time is spent in the outpatient subspecialty clinics, such as Cardiology, Gastroenterology, Nephrology, Pulmonary, Rheumatology and Endocrinology.

Complementing this extensive outpatient clinical exposure, we offer a rich, weekly academic half-day that includes seminars in core topics of primary care medicine, evidence-based medicine, and wellness sessions. Our PGY1 residents also have an additional academic half-day each block for Art and Practice sessions, which focus on equitable patient-centered care topics such as unconscious bias, social determinants of health and health literacy .  Woven throughout the block is our quality improvement curriculum which includes real-time, resident-driven project implementation, classroom didactics, and online certification modules.  Finally, it is during the ambulatory blocks that residents engage in Simulation Lab activities.  



The Internal Medicine Residency Program at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s-West recognizes the unique skillset required of primary care physicians to practice in our current healthcare landscape.  As such, we are thrilled to offer an innovative Primary Care Track for residents seeking to become experts in primary care medicine.  Through this track, residents gain enhanced exposure to topics beyond those typically covered in the traditional ambulatory block.  The track is fully integrated into our categorical program; Primary Care Track residents engage in the same rotations as their colleagues, including the Intensive Care Units, yet are provided increased elective time dedicated to primary care-related activities.  All primary care track residents will maintain a practice at the Ryan Adair Center in Central Harlem, located in a HRSA-designated medically underserved area, which will allow exposure to a diverse population with a multitude of complex diseases. 

The track is composed of clinical and non-clinical experiences as well as half-day didactic sessions during Primary Care elective blocks.  Educational sessions for residents in the track cover a broad array of topics introducing residents to the fundamentals of primary care medicine such as healthcare policy and practice models, population health, addiction medicine, physician communication skills, musculoskeletal exam skills, pearls of coding and billing, behavioral health integration, community oriented primary care, hands-on procedural sessions in the Simulation Lab, ethics, reflection rounds, cultural competency, and geriatric medicine.  All Primary Care Track residents are expected to develop a longitudinal project over the course of three years with protected project time allotted during each primary care block.

Our outstanding primary care faculty, who are committed to educating and mentoring the next generation of primary care physicians, bring to the table a broad range of clinical and academic interests. Through this track we aim to provide general skills training while supporting each resident in their particular area of interest within primary care.

Features of our Primary Care Track include:

  • Participation in an immersive community medicine rotation focused on caring for   urban, at- risk populations
  • Exposure to a multitude of primary care-relevant clinical opportunities
  • Clinical rotation at an HIV primary care faculty practice
  • Protected didactic sessions and workshops focused on primary care medicine topics
  • Home visits with the nationally renowned Visiting Doctors Program at Mount Sinai
  • Exposure to innovative practice models
  • Longitudinal project engagement with 1:1 faculty mentorship
  • Individually-tailored elective schedules as PGY2 and PGY3

The training schedule is as follows:

PGY1: (3 elective blocks) All PGY1’s in the track participate in a novel community medicine rotation focused on caring for at-risk populations near their outpatient clinic site in Central Harlem.  The rotation introduces residents to topics such as social determinants of health and health disparities, community-based organization partnerships, home visits, addiction medicine, immigrant health, and the impact of community on health outcomes.  In addition, PGY1’s in the track will have the opportunity to engage in a broad range of relevant clinical rotations including; family planning, musculoskeletal medicine, home visits, dermatology, primary care for patients with HIV, and exposure to innovative primary care practices.

PGY2: (3 elective blocks) PGY2’s in the track have the opportunity to participate in the sessions above in addition to crafting a more tailored schedule focused on their particular area of interest.  Additional independent study time is allotted to allow residents to develop a longitudinal project with a focus on one aspect of comprehensive care.  Such projects can include quality improvement initiatives, advocacy, and curriculum development and will be overseen by faculty mentors, with the goal of presenting the work to a broader academic audience.

PGY3: (4 elective blocks) PGY3’s in the track will devote time to independent projects and individually-tailored clinical experiences, as well as hone their leadership and teaching skills through Resident-as-Preceptor sessions in the outpatient resident clinics.  In addition, transition-to-practice didactics and career seminars will provide guidance toward life after residency.  PGY3’s will have the opportunity to lead some of the small group discussions for all PC Track residents centered on a topic of their choosing.

Applicants interested in the Primary Care Track should apply using our ERAS number.  For further questions, please contact the Primary Care Track Director, Dr. Tamara Goldberg at Tamara.Goldberg@mountsinai.org.

 

Housestaff Stories:

Gabriela Bernal, PGY1

It is easy to quickly recognise how special our program is at Mt. Sinai St. Luke’s-West. The team which makes up our program is a testament to cultural diversity; the richness of their experience and knowledge inspires me to learn and grow every day I go to work. As interns, we come from different places and have different interests for our future in medicine; yet we have a team of residents, mentors, and leaders cheering us on, to guide and support us down whichever road we decide to take.

At the same time, my new friends and colleagues make it effortless to feel a sense of belonging in the program, especially in this sometimes-hectic transitional period from medical school to residency.  So far, I'm excited about the exposure to incredibly varied pathology and the opportunity to make a difference for our patients, which is unparalleled by any other place.

This program was among my first interviews, and that day stayed with me throughout the season, making my first choice surprisingly easy in the end. I’m loving living in New York, experiencing the opportunities that only a program like Mt. Sinai St. Luke’s-West can give you, and can’t wait to share the rest of this journey with my colleagues, both in and out of the hospital.

Kun Chen, PGY 3

Residency is tough everywhere, but here at St Luke's and West, you'll find a family of co-residents that are down-to-Earth and very supportive of each other. There's great camaraderie both inside and outside of the hospital, and by the end of your three years here, your co-residents will start to feel like family.

Another thing that stands out to me about this program is that you will find faculty and leadership that are really supportive of your career goals, care about your well-being, listen well, and advocate for you. I've found great mentors who push me to be a better person and a stronger physician and have supported me through a major change in specialty over halfway through residency.

The clinical experience here is strong and the patient population is very diverse - I've really appreciated being able to take care of the Harlem/upper Manhattan population at St Luke's and at my primary care clinic, as well as going down West and seeing many tourists from around the world as well as the midtown population, and also rotating through Sloan Kettering and being able to treat cancer patients.

And of course, living in New York City is one of the best parts about being here!




 

Laura Chen, PGY3

When I was applying for residency, I knew I wanted to learn medicine from a diverse patient population. What better way than to attend residency in New York City? As a native New Yorker, I knew I would get great training in my own city. The reason I picked Mount Sinai St. Luke’s – West was the feeling of community and camaraderie amongst the residents as well as the support from the leadership that were clearly conveyed on my interview day. I am currently in my last year of residency and my first impressions of this program holds true to this day. Many of the alumni from this program remain in our hospital or hospital system to pursue fellowships and attending jobs, which says something about the impact of the program. The resources and opportunities available from the prestigious Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center were added bonuses to the whole package. I made one of the best decision of my career by choosing Internal Medicine residency at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s- West.

Scott Kaplan, PGY3

As a fourth year medical student I had the opportunity to rotate through the Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Cardiac Intensive Care Unit.  There I was able to experience first hand the high level of clinical training imparted on the residents, as well as the jovial, supportive environment created by the house staff.  Through my interview day and the start of my residency at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s – West, I found that the first impressions I developed during my rotation were just a small piece of what makes training here such an incredible experience.

Mount Sinai St Luke’s and Mount Sinai West hospitals are deeply ingrained in the fabric of New York City, serving two distinct and diverse patient populations within the borough of Manhattan.  The diversity of NYC is felt within the house staff as well, as MSSLW attracts intelligent, caring, and friendly medical residents from all over the world, whom I now consider family.  It is no surprise then that many of the graduating house staff choose to stay within the Mount Sinai health system for fellowship, hospitalist, and primary care positions throughout the city.

As an internal medicine resident in my final year of residency, I strongly believe that the clinical skills and academic guidance provided by the esteemed faculty at MSSLW have set me on a path towards future success.  Although the decision-making process can be challenging, I know that I made the right choice picking MSSLW. 

Jacqueline Sheehan, PGY2

My choice to match at Mount Sinai St. Luke's - West has permanently shaped my life for the better. During my interview day, I was greeted by a warm, friendly atmosphere that appeared supportive of academic and professional growth, as well as resident wellness. During residency, I have developed lifelong friendships with like-minded people, who I have the privilege of calling not only my friends, but also my colleagues. This support network has unquestionably enhanced my overall learning and professional advancement, but has also provided a home away from home. The diversity and heterogeneity of our patient population, coupled with the ability to rotate at institutions such as Memorial Sloan Kettering and The Mount Sinai Hospital, provide unique learning opportunities for all residents of this program. I found Mount Sinai St. Luke's - West to be exactly as advertised on my interview day and would choose it again instantly!

Angad Uberoi, PGY2

If there was one attribute I could use to describe my experience at Mount Sinai St. Luke's and West, it would be the diversity. It starts with the diversity of the house-staff. Interacting with people from different parts of the world, with various levels of training, I have learned more from my peers than I could have at most other programs. There is also a great diversity of experiences and training. Both hospitals serve very different populations with different medical needs. The Ryan centers serve a vital role in providing primary care services to underserved patients throughout the city. This is topped off with great subspecialty training experiences at the prestigious Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center as well as at Mount Sinai Hospital across the park. Almost half-way through residency, I already feel very confident of my training and ability to cope with most situations.

To add to the great training, what makes this program even more special is the sense of camaraderie between the residents. I know that there is always someone to turn to for support, not just amongst  my co-residents but also from our extremely approachable and friendly leadership. If I had to go through the match process again, I would choose MSSLW again in a heartbeat!

Pavan Paka, PGY1

If you have ever had a pair of sneakers that fit perfectly and made you feel excited to go for a run. Even allowed you to push harder and farther because you were supported, then you will already have an idea of what it feels like to train at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s-West (MSSLW).

When I was on the residency interview trail, my stop at MSSLW was a breath of fresh air. Not only was I invigorated by the diversity of the program, but also by how everyone was genuinely trying to get to know me. Beyond schools and scores, I felt they were looking for individuals to welcome into their family.

As a new member of this team, I am truly humbled. There is no shortage of encouragement and guidance along the way. The intensive clinical training over multiple sites, research emphasis, fellowship support, and a thoughtful academic/wellness curriculum that MSSLW offers are crucial in developing a foundation of effective and lasting skills that will span my entire career.

Intern year signifies the beginning of a new challenge. If I had to choose a pair of sneakers to traverse this path again, they would still proudly be emblazoned with MSSLW.

Yeraz Khachatoorian, PGY1

The positive atmosphere and the graduate medical education presentation on the day of interview at MSSLW was the reflection of how much the program’s faculty values the importance of quality of education and residents’ physical, mental, and social wellbeing.

The internal medicine residency at MSSLW stands out in many levels. The highly educational and interactive rounds, lectures, and simulation lab bring a rich learning experience to every working day. The multicultural, compassionate, and supportive house staff are always ready to help each other and give valuable advice, making the strong residency family unparalleled.

Last but not the least, living and working in the heart of New York City gives us the chance not only to develop professional skills but also to have a great experience connecting with highly developed, cultural and spiritual part of the city life, which I believe not that many cities in the world can offer.