Categorical Residency

After three years of training in Internal Medicine, our residents are fully prepared for any career in medicine they chose to pursue. Each year of training adds progressively more responsibility for both the care of patients and teaching less-experienced learners.

As a PGY1, you will be exposed to the breadth and depth of Internal Medicine. You will spend on average two months on the General Medicine floors, admitting both routine and unusual cases. You will begin to learn HIV medicine on our inpatient services for four weeks and Cardiology for another month. You will get the opportunity to fine-tune your neurology examination skills with two weeks on the neurology consult service. All interns have two weeks of electives in Endocrinology to obtain exposure to this subspecialty. Our interns develop skills in the care of critically ill patients in both the CCU and the Medical ICU. A month at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) affords the opportunity to be exposed to quaternary-level cancer care.

A typical PGY1 Schedule is as follows:

PGY1

Weeks

Gen Med Floors

6-10

Specialty Floors

2-4

MSKCC

4

Elective

2

Night Float

4-6

MICU/CCU

6-8

ED

4

Ambulatory Care

12-14

Vacation

4

Consults

2-4


Our PGY2s gain more responsibility for patient care and supervision of their team on the General Medicine floors and subspecialty teams (HIV, Cardiology). Half of the class has an additional opportunity to rotate through MSKCC. One full month is spent in the ED and Critical Care units to build confidence in our residents to care for critically ill patients.

A typical PGY2 Schedule is as follows:

PGY2

Weeks

Gen Med Floors


6-8

Specialty Floors

2-4

MSKCC

4

Consults

4-6

Elective/Research

8

MICU/CCU

6-10

Night Float

4

Ambulatory Care

12-14

Vacation

4


As a PGY3, the formative experience is the time spent as the screening consult resident who is the liaison for patients going to the ICU and the medical consult resident who provides consultation to other services in the hospital. Seniors also spend time on the floors and in the critical care units to consolidate their leadership skills. Time is allocated for you to customize your schedule based upon your particular career interests.

A typical PGY3 Schedule is as follows:

PGY3

Weeks

Gen Med Floors

6-8

Specialty Floors

0-2

MICU

4-6

Consults

8-10

Elective/Research

6

ICU Screens

4-6

Medical Consult

2-4

Ambulatory Care

12-14

Vacation

4

During their two-week ambulatory blocks, categorical residents have the unique opportunity to serve as primary care providers for a panel of patients at one of three community-based centers.  These centers are part of the William F. Ryan Community Health Network, a Federally Qualified Health Center accredited by the Joint Commission and an NCQA Level 3 Patient-Centered Medical Home, which provides high quality care to vulnerable, under- and uninsured populations.  Additional time is spent in the outpatient subspecialty clinics, such as Cardiology, Gastroenterology, Nephrology, Pulmonary, Rheumatology and Endocrinology.

Complementing this extensive outpatient clinical exposure, we offer a rich, weekly academic half-day that includes seminars in core topics of primary care medicine, evidence-based medicine, and wellness sessions. Our PGY1 residents also have an additional academic half-day each block for Art and Practice sessions, which focus on equitable patient-centered care topics such as unconscious bias, social determinants of health and health literacy .  Woven throughout the block is our quality improvement curriculum which includes real-time, resident-driven project implementation, classroom didactics, and online certification modules.  Finally, it is during the ambulatory blocks that residents engage in Simulation Lab activities.  



The Medical Education Track is for residents interested in careers in medical education. Housestaff are invited to apply for the track at the end of their intern year and work through a two-year curriculum covering learning theory, curriculum design and implementation, feedback and evaluation, and medical education scholarship. The core sessions of the track occur outside of elective time, preserving the ability of track residents to pursue subspecialty clinical experiences. Residents in the Medical Education Track will help to create and implement a medical education project through the two years of the curriculum, with support and mentorship from the program. Projects developed through the track have included a professional skills curriculum for the residency, a pathophysiology-based monthly conference for the residents led by core faculty members, an enhanced ambulatory nutrition curriculum, and a peer-observation program aimed at improving teaching skills on resident-led rounds.

In addition to a focus on curricular design, the track will develop residents' skills as a medical educator, with additional teaching opportunities both at the residency and medical school level. Track residents are exposed to mentors and leaders in medical education throughout the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the Mount Sinai Health System.

Applicants interested in the Medical Education Track should apply to the Categorical Residency Program at Mount Sinai Morningside and Mount Sinai West. Interested applicants should make note of their interest on their application, so appropriate interviews can be arranged.

Examples of projects developed by Mount Sinai Morningside/West Track participants:

2016-2017

  • Point of Care Ultrasound Curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents

2017-2018

  • Formalizing Peer-Driven Electrocardiogram Learning Among Internal Medicine Residents
  • Advanced Curriculum on Breast Cancer Prevention: Comprehensive Breast Cancer Screening and intervention strategy beyond Mammogram
  • Advanced Curriculum on Bedside Teaching for Internal Medicine Residents

2018-2019

  • A contextual needs assessment of mechanical ventilation education of Internal Medicine Residents: Barriers, Challenges, and Opportunities
  • Bedside Teaching and the Physical Exam
  • Developing a clinical nutrition curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents
  • Digital Tools to Enhance Clinical Reasoning
  • Developing a curriculum to help Internal Medicine Residents to navigate End-of-Life Conversations and Advanced Care Planning
  • Teaching How to Conduct Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis to Internal Medicine Residents
  • Introduction to the Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) for Internal Medicine Residents
  • Novel teaching methods for Internal Medicine daily noon conferences

2019-2020

  • Integrating Narrative Medicine and Storytelling to Internal Medicine Residency Curriculum
  • Developing a high-yield application based Hematology/Oncology Curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents
  • Inpatient and Outpatient Diabetes Management
  • Developing a curriculum on High Value Evidenced-based Care

2020-2021 

  • Problem-based learning curriculum for interns and residents on ICU/CCU and inpatient Medicine floors
  • The Evidenced-Based Physical Examination
  • Effective Scientific Communication
  • The use of Opioids, Non-opioid analgesics and non-pharmacologic interventions in Pain Management
  • Research Methodology and Statistics 101
  • Developing an outpatient Geriatrics curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents

 

 

Tomohiro Fujisaki, MD, PGY-1

The elderly population in my home country, Japan, remains an underserved segment of society. There are not so many primary care doctors due to lack of established general internal medicine (GIM) training. Instead the elderly are seen by providers whose specialty is divided into anatomical and physiological systems. The complex medical needs of this rapidly growing elderly population caught my attention as a young doctor, and I was inspired to pursue GIM training in the U.S. to become a reliable internist equipped with a wide range of knowledge and skills in not only a subspecialty but also GIM.

The Internal Medicine Residency Program at Mount Sinai Morningside and Mount Sinai West offers a unique opportunity for trainees to be exposed to a diverse group of patients in two different large teaching hospitals and several outpatient clinics. I felt the diverse patient population in terms of ethnicity, sexual orientation, religious practice, and socioeconomic status here in Manhattan would bring me an extraordinary educational environment. I also liked the diversity of faculty members as well. This program is open to applicants from all over the world, making a strong multinational team with understanding of multicultural differences. The location of this program was also very attractive. It only takes five minutes to the Times Square, Central Park and the Hudson River, allowing residents to have vibrant lifestyles. Fourth, this program is a part of Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and residents have opportunities to participate in academic activities collaborating with faculty members in other sister hospitals. Finally, the many Japanese physicians who have pursued residency training through this program have inspired me, as they have become leaders in their respective fields upon their return to Japan and I used to read textbooks written by them. For these reasons, I wished to further my future career goals in this program.

As we progress in our training, I am further convinced that the opportunity to be trained here will provide residents with rich educational environment and best-evidence-based knowledge applicable to the treatment of future patients. Considering the fact that I could collaborate with some researchers from the Mount Sinai Hospital and Mount Sinai Beth Israel Hospital, this program can easily offer a great opportunity for residents to do some research activities and make outstanding physician-scientists. I believe this program can provide residents with ideal environment to develop into the type of physician they wish to be. I am so excited and looking forward to working with incoming new residents.

Lady Njemeh Danso, MD, PGY-1

My name is Lady Njemeh Danso (née Saho); I was born and raised in The Gambia. The decision to go to medical school and become a cardiologist was borne of a deeply personal experience of losing my dearest little sister to heart disease. Since that painful and life-changing experience in my formative years, medicine has been my passion. I wanted to become a cardiologist; therefore, choosing a residency program that matches my career goal was quite important to me. Matching at my number one choice, in a world-class medical institution where physicians are trained to become clinical experts and leaders, makes my dream a reality.

The Mount Sinai Morningside and Mount Sinai West Internal Medicine Residency Program provides a supportive environment for both my professional and personal development; as such, I look forward to the next three years of learning and training in a conducive environment to meet the challenges of modern medicine and cutting edge medical technology. My journey from interviewing for Residency to my current status as an intern is awe-inspiring for I have been accorded the opportunity to share my story in a safe, friendly, and supportive environment. The warm welcome I received from the program leadership, senior residents, interns and the staff is positively exemplary. Mentorship is really important in the program; each resident is provided with strong mentorship from the very beginning, which goes to show the commitment of the program leadership to the success of each resident. I am personally happy with the mentorship program and deeply grateful to my mentor. In addition, of being reputable and knowledgeable, she continues to work with me in all areas of career development.  I also want to mention the extraordinary efforts to keep trainees safe in the current COVID-19 pandemic. Personal protective equipment is readily available and a great emphasis is placed on mask wearing, social distancing and daily temperature monitoring. Such proactive actions go to show that the health, safety, and wellbeing of both residents and patients is a priority for our hospital.

In this program, every senior resident is a teacher and a leader. I have personally benefited from their teaching and leadership. It is noteworthy that my seniors are eager and happy to share their knowledge and skills with me at all times. As a world-class institution, the hospital attracts talents from all parts of the world and from diverse and multicultural backgrounds. Here, the world comes to us and I could not be happier to be getting my medical training in this highly sought-after institution. Diversity is honored and celebrated because with it, we can learn from colleagues from all around the world and better serve our already diverse patient population. I am deeply honored and privileged to be receiving my medical training at the prestigious Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Morningside/West Internal Medicine Residency Program in New York City. Against substantial odds, my unlikely journey that started in a small West African country of The Gambia, through Morocco, culminated here. For prospective applicants, I strongly and wholeheartedly recommend this program and I cannot wait to have you with us next year.

James Prince, MD, PGY-1

When I applied to residency I wanted to be in New York for family reasons, and applying to Mount Sinai West/Morningside was a no-brainer given its location, reputation, and curriculum. However, it was not until the interview process when I realized that this program is unmatched. Meeting with the current residents and hearing about their experiences gave me real insight into the education and camaraderie amongst residents. Now, 4 months into my residency, I have seen first-hand the genuine sense of community that comes with being a resident here. There has been an incredible rapport from day 1, and I have been made to feel supported in every sense. Your co-residents look out for one another, professionally and socially. You are never short of a game of football (‘soccer’), weekend outings, or drinks with your fellow residents. If you have a problem with a patient, there will always be someone willing, and more than able, to give you a hand. Your chiefs, leadership and administration are all-exceptional, and make every effort to insure you achieve your goals.

There are great opportunities for research, electives, and support towards fellowship, but, for me, the diversity of the program is its biggest strength. There are residents from all over the world and everybody brings their own unique experience and perspective on topics - whether it be medical or non-medical. In addition, being located in the heart of New York, you are exposed to complex patients from all walks of life. This degree of diversity provides a level of training not many can compete with. Couple that with living in NY, and you cannot go wrong.

Hendrik Sy, MD, PGY-2

I chose this program because I felt that it was a great fit. During interview day, I had the impression that residents were supported and that they truly liked working here. I knew that I wanted to match at an urban hospital with a diverse patient population, broad clinical exposure and a wide range of research opportunities. The program certainly offers all of that as part of the Mount Sinai Health System and with its collaboration with MSKCC. It also has a history of great fellowship matches, which is of importance to me since I plan to apply for an Infectious Disease fellowship.

Looking back, coming here was the right decision. A great strength of this program is the supportive and truly diverse group of residents I work with every day, many of whom have become good friends. I am confident that I am receiving a very robust training in internal medicine, which will prepare me well for fellowship. This stems from the teaching we receive and from our wide range of clinical exposure by working with uniquely diverse patients who come to us from the Bronx to Midtown Manhattan. We also have a strong educational curriculum and recently transitioned to academic half days - a good example of how program leadership seeks to make continuous improvements based on residents’ feedback. This flexibility is also reflected in helping us reach our goals. For instance, everyone was very helpful in accommodating a clinical tropical medicine and global health elective I asked to pursue during PGY-2. I also appreciate the approachability and the enthusiasm of faculty members who are eager to collaborate on research projects. This program is a great place to train and I would definitely choose it again. 

Joshua Berookhim, MD, PGY-3

When I was applying for residency, there were a few aspects of a training program that I was looking for. The first aspect was a program at a hospital with a high volume of patients, as well as a wide variety of pathologies. The second was a program that was able to match their residents into competitive fellowship programs. And the third was a program where I would get along with the residents. The Internal Medicine residency at Mount Sinai Morningside and Mount Sinai West fulfilled that criteria and more.

Patient population is diverse which allows us to explore each sub-specialty of Internal Medicine in a whole new way; we learn how to manage the classic bread-and-butter diseases and the rare zebras that I thought that I would only read about in medical school. Here, we routinely send our residents to incredible fellowships year after year. Here I have found residents that are not just incredible coworkers in the hospital but are now some of my closest friends outside of the hospital. In fact, within the Mount Sinai community, we have a basketball group composed of residents, fellows, and attendings where we meet multiple times throughout the week to play; it is now one my favorite ways to spend my free time. 

Sananda Moctezuma, MD, PGY-3

I chose Mount Sinai Morningside and Mount Sinai West as the next step in my training because it offered the unparalleled opportunity to care not only for a diverse patient population, but to train in a system that would allow exposure to inequities related to social determinants of health. Growing up in Venezuela, a country defined by scarcity and healthcare inequity, shaped my outlook on life.  Experiencing the ripple effects of a social crisis and forced migration has fostered the outmost respect for diversity, including the impact of gender, religion, and culture in doctor-patient relationships. These challenges have fueled my interest in health inequalities. I believe that, by virtue of their role as health advocates, physicians are key in advancing healthcare. We have a responsibility to understand the social determinants of health in order to empower people and communities to achieve their potential for health.  During residency, I have had the opportunity to work with physicians of various backgrounds to spur critical thinking, and create population health advocates through transformative learning. I am grateful for working alongside great attendings that share my values and have helped shaped my career. The Residency Program has incentivized many of my projects and has been flexible to allow me to complete them. I have been given all the tools I need to face any challenge and continue my training.