Surgical Volunteerism

We recognize that at the core of surgical training is the ability to take care of any patient with any level of resources. Surgical volunteer trips give you the opportunity to practice with non-English speaking patients using less-than-optimal equipment and supplies.  Participating in these trips helps you maintain your focus on clinical duties while helping you understand the impact that access to surgical care can have on the world as a whole. At Mount Sinai, we believe these trips can allow us to bridge the global health care gap, one patient at a time.

We recognize that at the core of surgical training is the ability to take care of any patient with any level of resources. Surgical volunteer trips give you the opportunity to practice with non-English speaking patients using less-than-optimal equipment and supplies.  Participating in these trips helps you maintain your focus on clinical duties while helping you understand the impact that access to surgical care can have on the world as a whole. At Mount Sinai, we believe thesetrips can allow us to bridge the global health care gap, one patient at a time. 

“My global surgery experience has far exceeded my highest expectations. Not only have I gone on three surgical trips, but as a PGY2 I was granted the opportunity to organize a mission to Nicaragua where, with the support of five surgical attendings, we operated on more than 70 patients in one week. This component of my residency has been unforgettable and invaluable.”
- Brianne Sullivan, MD, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic, 2017, 2018, 2019

“The trip really opened my eyes to the needs of people without access to surgical care. The opportunity to serve these genuinely humble people of Nigeria is an experience that I will never forget. I am inspired to make surgical missions a part of my life.”
- David Lee, MD, after a mission to Akwa Ibom, Nigeria, 2011

Image of two doctors performing surgery

“Though this incredible journey was short, the heightened awareness and appreciation I have gained will be long-lasting. This irreplaceable impact has led to my vow to not take for granted even the most basic amenities or misuse our resources on a day-to-day basis.”
- Elaine Chan, MD, after a mission trip to Abidjan, Cte D’Ivoire, 2010

“The experience was invaluable to me as a doctor and a person. Residency can be long and arduous, and it is easy to lose sight of why we became doctors—namely to serve those less fortunate than ourselves. This trip renewed my faith that, when distilled to its most basic essence, medicine is a noble profession that we are lucky to be a small part of.”
- George Dreszer, MD, after a mission trip to Pucallpa, Peru, 2008